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Death is Preferable to Communism.
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Built for the first World War by Eddystone who was a subsidiary of Remington. Based on the English Pattern 14 rifle but was redesigned in 30-06 in early 1917. Most American soldiers were issues M1917's as 1903's were built by Govt Arsenals and slower to produce.

Some were refinished after the war and sent as war aid to various countries around the world...such as Canada, England, China, Signapore, Vietnam, and others.

Yours looks like a nice one with the original stock eagle in tact. Should be a good shooter.
 
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Nice looker right there.
 
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Yours is prettier than mine. LOL. There was an issue with many M1917's wherein the receiver would crack on the bottom ahead of the forward recoil lug when they were re-barreled. I'm sure someone here knows more than me regarding this issue, but I've been warned to inspect any M1917 that I want to buy to be sure there isn't a crack in the receiver.

IMG_1318.jpg
 
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Chief cook and bottle washer
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Great looking old gun, the older I get the more interesting these older ones become.
Even catch myself asking what stories could you tell, and then I have to reign in the imagination.
 

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That's a nice one. The 1917 is like the M1 Carbine in that most every part is marked with the manufacturer. This site has a list of the marked parts. My Winchester 1917 has all Win parts except for 4-5 pieces.
 
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The 1917 Enfield actions are considered to be stronger than the '03 and for decades were a favorite amongst gunsmiths to do magnum conversions.

Original, unmolested 1917s are becoming scarcer - and more expensive - by the day. Sporterized 1917s are pretty common and can often be had cheap. If you don't care about the rifle being in original .mil trim, a sporterized 1917 can be a very strong and accurate shooter.

An original .mil 1917 is a fairly heavy rifle and so, especially for older guys like myself, isn't much fun to carry in the bush all day. To the good, because of its weight, a 1917 is a good way to introduce new shooters to the recoil of the 30-06. The '06's recoil can be roughly comparable to that of the 12 gauge. While that's not intimidating to (most) experienced shooters, new shooters are often surprised by it. Again, a 1917 can be gentler on the shoulder when using standard velocity '06 ammunition.

Best
Doc
 

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Looks like a lot of eddystone parts, marked E

does the front of the stock, under the barrel have an E stamp?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
hard to tell, but it looks like an E there not 100% sure, the barrel does have an E with the flaming bomb and the 10-18
 

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Nice old rifle made in October, 1918. With the better sights than on Springfields and Mausers, it might be a good one for the vintage service rifle matches.
 

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If you ever tire of it let me know. I would take it off your hands.

I have a Winchester and the Enfield would be good company
 

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Looks good. I shot mine in the Vintage Bolt Match at Magnolia R&P. Had a blast, despite a few snarky comments on its looks. Should provide years of trouble free service. Have fun with it.
 

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If taken-care-of, it's an excellent rifle.
I live in Oregon; but enjoy following you guys "down under."
I shot a Vintage Rifle Match at my club last year, using my 1918 - .30-06, 03-Springfield and was soundly beaten by an old man using this same rifle. I asked to use his after the match and discovered that it shot even tighter groups than mine -- which was an NRA Match Rifle, reconditioned in the 1930s. Keep it, shoot it and enjoy!
 
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