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1944 German K98 Mauser, in 8mm, unfortunately sporterized. The Safety lever would not swing freely. Disassembled and found that Bubba and the infamous Dremel tool had been here before me. Ordered a new Safety and Firing Pin (didn’t have any in inventory). Installed both and its all copasetic. He also had a box of old Remington ammo, price on the box was $4.38 🤦‍♂️. I did advise the customer this would be well worth returning to it’s original military condition, the value would increase dramatically.
Vance Moore
Whynot Gunsmith Shop, Meridian, Mississippi
Facebook: Whynot Gunsmith Shop
Instagram: vance_gunsmith
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I still believe that a basic M98 rifle is one of the best choices for a survival arm. I'm not talking about a combat rifle - though the M98 is certainly no slouch - but the sort of rifle, if you were limited to just one, that you would choose to face anything the world might throw at you. I have several of them, including a Belgian FN chambered in 30-06.

After well over a hundred years, they are still examples of fantastic, reliable engineering.

Best
Doc
 

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I still believe that a basic M98 rifle is one of the best choices for a survival arm. I'm not talking about a combat rifle - though the M98 is certainly no slouch - but the sort of rifle, if you were limited to just one, that you would choose to face anything the world might throw at you. I have several of them, including a Belgian FN chambered in 30-06.

After well over a hundred years, they are still examples of fantastic, reliable engineering.

Best
Doc
Hard to beat the Mauser action. My preference is the Swedish version, in their caliber, 6.5x55. 6.5 mm projectiles have a superior ballistic coefficient compared to most calibers, including .30 (.30-06, .308, etc.). One reason why the 6.5 Creedmoor came into existence, and is winning so many long-distance competitions. But the Swede is a Mauser and is difficult to beat. I have won 7 state championships with a 1912 vintage 1896. Could not have done it if it weren't for the superior engineering that Herr Mauser put into this design.
 

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He should have let you work your blueing magic on the old girl.
I to have one , the barrel is different it’s now in ‘06 and it’s in a Boyd’s stock,someone did a great job reblueing. It still was horrible shooter decided to add a timney trigger before trading it off, wow! what a difference,now she’s my deer getter
 

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I love the basic Mauser design and most of its variants, but the rifles have one major failing (IMHO). Their (tiny) V-notch rear sights were made for 18 YO infantrymen with perfect vision. Others need not apply...

In my case I'm 65 YO and have excellent eyesight (thanks to cataract surgery ;-) but still don't like stock Mauser sights - with only two exceptions. The Spanish FR-7 and FR-8 Mauser rifles were fitted with excellent peep sights at the arsenals. The FR-7 was produced on the weaker M93 action, but the FR-8 was made on a standard - and stronger - M98 action. As far as I know, these rifles were the only Mausers ever produced with factory peep sights. My FR-8 (in 7.62 NATO) is my favorite brush and pig hunting rifle.

It's not my favorite long(er) range rifle, but for quick, up close and personal hunting it works a treat.

Best
Doc
 
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