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That’s a pretty gun.
 

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Think The Armory in Jackson has/had one.
 
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Still did as of a week ago
He actually has two of them. The one on display at the store is unfired. The other he shoots periodically.
 
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If I had the $ to spend on such I'd be afraid to shoot it, it's too valuable. Kinda like if I still had m MPi5, parts too scarce, price too high, why shoot it? If it breaks you have a $50,000 paperweight.
 

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There was this US Cavalry officer, blonde haired dude named Custer, who thought the Gatling guns were too heavy & burdensome to bring with his troops on their way to Little Big Horn.
Whoops.
 

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Apologies for the thread derail here.

I like this one from the movie, The Accountant: :)

232891
 
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Late one night, or maybe early one morning, or something like that, I went to visit the photographer Willian Eggleston with a friend of mine. We walked in the front door and there was a gatling gun right there in the entry to the house, pointing at the front door. My friend and I spent the next couple of hours trying to convince him to let us shoot it. No luck. He said that it took hours to clean, and that seemed reasonable. It was an awesome weapon. I had to use the restroom, and there were at least five different and curious pistols laying about in that tiny space
 

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The Miniguns, Vulcans and similar weapons all owe their development to the old Gatling gun. I have heard that the development of these later weapons began when researchers, many decades later, simply added an electric motor drive to an original Gatling. I've also wondered how minigun-type weapons might have changed aerial warfare in WWII. The basic technology was there, but no one - at the time - thought to use it.

Can you imagine WWII fighters and bombers, on either side, equipped with those things?

Best
Doc
 

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Late one night, or maybe early one morning, or something like that, I went to visit the photographer Willian Eggleston with a friend of mine. We walked in the front door and there was a gatling gun right there in the entry to the house, pointing at the front door. My friend and I spent the next couple of hours trying to convince him to let us shoot it. No luck. He said that it took hours to clean, and that seemed reasonable. It was an awesome weapon. I had to use the restroom, and there were at least five different and curious pistols laying about in that tiny space
Great story.
He wasn't lying-they are a PITA to clean.
Way back when in my hometown we had two gun shops. One was the newest with all the latest high speed low drag cool stuff. I actually became a part time RO and firearms instructor in the evenings for that range after I turned 21 in between rodeoin and shooting competitions. The other was a small dusty shop that had been there since Jesus wore short pants. Ran by a REAL shooter/gunsmith that learned his trade in the army. At one time he was ranked in the top 3 shooters in the world using a M14. ANYWAYS, all us pups hung out there and drank his coffee,played with his Newfie and drooled over all the stuff in the racks. Him and Dad were old buds. One night he called me and told me to get "all the rest of your freedloading friends" and meet him at the shop early Sunday morning. We all pulled up in our jacked up Chevys and Fords wondering what was up. Well Don was not only the baddest ass gunsmith around he had a deal with the local museum to once a year take out ALL of the firearms and clean/polish them. Well they had a gatlin gun in .45-70 along with a ton of other firearms. Don loved us, but would never admit it. We took ALL those old guns out to the national forest range and shot the hell outta them for as long as we had ammo. THAT ammo was supplied by Don, and I found out many years later-my father. Now Don thought we got the short end of the deal by having to sit in that shop and, with his supervision clean all those weapons including that gatling. He was WAY wrong. That was one of the best days of our lives. Funny thing about that too. I think it made us "knuckleheads" grow up some because as long as I lived in my hometown he never had to buy another can of coffee, a box of donuts or dog treats for that Newfie
Cranking the handle on that thing was awesome. Everybody wants to speed them up with a motor. That's fine an all but a steady hand on the crank and a guy standing by to feed ammo and that old warhorse will put the fear of God in ya I promise.

I have the machinist drawings and have been slowly gathering parts and raw material to build one of my own. It will take me longer than a "real" machinist because while I believe I have the skill, I am slower on a mill and a lathe than a guy that makes his living with one-BUT one day...
 

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The Miniguns, Vulcans and similar weapons all owe their development to the old Gatling gun. I have heard that the development of these later weapons began when researchers, many decades later, simply added an electric motor drive to an original Gatling. I've also wondered how minigun-type weapons might have changed aerial warfare in WWII. The basic technology was there, but no one - at the time - thought to use it.

Can you imagine WWII fighters and bombers, on either side, equipped with those things?

Best
Doc
The technology was there for use during WWII. Gatling even had one before WWI

From Wikipedia in the history of the mini gun.

"The ancestor to the modern minigun was a hand cranked mechanical device invented in the 1860s by Richard Jordan Gatling. Gatling later replaced the hand-cranked mechanism of a rifle-caliber Gatling gun with an electric motor, a relatively new invention at the time. Even after Gatling slowed the mechanism, the new electric-powered Gatling gun had a theoretical rate of fire of 3,000 rounds per minute, roughly three times the rate of a typical modern, single-barreled machine gun. Gatling's electric-powered design received U.S. Patent #502,185 on July 25, 1893. Despite Gatling's improvements, the Gatling gun fell into disuse after cheaper, lighter-weight, recoil and gas operated machine guns were invented; Gatling himself went bankrupt for a period"

During World War I, several German companies were working on externally powered guns for use in aircraft. Of those, the best-known today is perhaps the Fokker-Leimberger, an externally powered 12-barrel rotary gun using the 7.92×57mm Mauser round; it was claimed to be capable of firing over 7,000 rpm, but suffered from frequent cartridge-case ruptures due to its "nutcracker", rotary split-breech design, which is fairly different from that of conventional rotary gun designs. None of these German guns went into production during the war, although a competing Siemens prototype (possibly using a different action), which was tried on the Western Front, scored a victory in aerial combat. The British also experimented with this type of split-breech during the 1950s, but they were also unsuccessful"
 

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Great story.
He wasn't lying-they are a PITA to clean.
Way back when in my hometown we had two gun shops. One was the newest with all the latest high speed low drag cool stuff. I actually became a part time RO and firearms instructor in the evenings for that range after I turned 21 in between rodeoin and shooting competitions. The other was a small dusty shop that had been there since Jesus wore short pants. Ran by a REAL shooter/gunsmith that learned his trade in the army. At one time he was ranked in the top 3 shooters in the world using a M14. ANYWAYS, all us pups hung out there and drank his coffee,played with his Newfie and drooled over all the stuff in the racks. Him and Dad were old buds. One night he called me and told me to get "all the rest of your freedloading friends" and meet him at the shop early Sunday morning. We all pulled up in our jacked up Chevys and Fords wondering what was up. Well Don was not only the baddest ass gunsmith around he had a deal with the local museum to once a year take out ALL of the firearms and clean/polish them. Well they had a gatlin gun in .45-70 along with a ton of other firearms. Don loved us, but would never admit it. We took ALL those old guns out to the national forest range and shot the hell outta them for as long as we had ammo. THAT ammo was supplied by Don, and I found out many years later-my father. Now Don thought we got the short end of the deal by having to sit in that shop and, with his supervision clean all those weapons including that gatling. He was WAY wrong. That was one of the best days of our lives. Funny thing about that too. I think it made us "knuckleheads" grow up some because as long as I lived in my hometown he never had to buy another can of coffee, a box of donuts or dog treats for that Newfie
Cranking the handle on that thing was awesome. Everybody wants to speed them up with a motor. That's fine an all but a steady hand on the crank and a guy standing by to feed ammo and that old warhorse will put the fear of God in ya I promise.

I have the machinist drawings and have been slowly gathering parts and raw material to build one of my own. It will take me longer than a "real" machinist because while I believe I have the skill, I am slower on a mill and a lathe than a guy that makes his living with one-BUT one day...
Mr. Eggleston had two big wooden cases full up with .45-70 ammunition, but his gun had a stick magazine. I can only imagine how much fun you had shooting all of this different guns.
 

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Mr. Eggleston had two big wooden cases full up with .45-70 ammunition, but his gun had a stick magazine. I can only imagine how much fun you had shooting all of this different guns.
As far as shooting goes that was certainly one of the best days of my life. We started out with arms from the War of Northern Aggression and ended up with M14 and 16's. For me the the Gatling, BAR, Tommygun and the 1919A4 were the highlights.
 
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