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Yeah, but a magnetic scale is gonna take forever...especially on pistol powder charges.

I just don't understand why $100 bill can't buy a decent scale
 

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msredneck said:
Yeah, but a magnetic scale is gonna take forever...especialluy on pistol powder charges.

I just don't understand why $100 bill can't buy a decent scale
OH i know. I usually just double check the charge on ever 100 rds or so when i use my Dillon 550. It throws a 5.7gr charge 9 times out of 10.
 

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I use an rcbs chargemaster combo. Bought the scale first and then the dispenser. It has probably been my best reloading purchase.
 

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I've got an older Dillon D_Terminator that I like pretty well. It doesn't look like the new ones and uses a 9V battery instead of the 4AA's as a matter of fact, so I'm not sure how good my opinion is worth on this one. That being said, the check weight on mine is usually pretty close, but I do recalibrate it from time to time. I've heard of people getting really nice scales for cheap from a college or larger high school when they upgrade. I sure remember some nice ones at Millsaps in the Chemistry lab. Something tells me they don't get rid of those real often though.

I will admit that I used to double check the charge on every couple hundred rounds or so when loading on my Dillons (550 and Super 1050), but I will also admit that I do it much less now. I always chronograph when big match time rolls around, and its never been a problem. Once set, they tend to stay that way, so it is nothing for me to load several thousand rounds between checking a throw.

Actually, I don't check just one. Consider trying this out if you haven't yet. Don't weigh one charge, weigh 5 or, even better, 10 together. Why? Better accuracy. For example, say you want to throw 5.2 grains. If you weighed five charges one at a time, you may get 5.1, 5.2, 5.2, 5.1, 5.2. Is that good enough? It may be; it may not. If you want them to all read 5.2 on the nose, you may be at the bench for a while. For example, if you increase the charge, you may start getting some individual 5.3's.

Now if you weigh all five together, you may get say, 25.7 grains for 5 throws (or say 51.4 for 10). Divide those by the number of throws, and your average throw is 5.14. Increase the charge by in a very small increment and do it again. Let's say 5 more now come back at 26.1 (or 10 at 52.2). Well, you are now throwing an average of 5.22 grains. Sure, if you don't change a thing, you may see a tenth or so variance one way or another, but look at the math, realistically the variance will be between approximately 5.18-5.24 grains, at the most.

I've used this technique and really like it. Generally, the more throws you make, the more accurate you are for a given scale's accuracy. 5 works ok but I really like 10 because of the better accuracy and the math is so simple as you are just moving the decimal place.

Probably not the most eloquent explanation/thread hijack, but I hope that made some sense. Anyone else do this?
 

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msredneck said:
I just don't understand why $100 bill can't buy a decent scale
I agree. To get a decent digital we may have to look to some chemistry supply stores or something like that. ...but I doubt they'll be under 100.
 
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I use the RCBS Rangemaster 750 and don't have any gripes with it. I also use the RCBS Chargemaster combo and don't have any gripes with it either. I leave my Chargemaster pluged in and the unit off. With either one, I ALWAYS calibrate first thing when I turn it on. Just because you have a beam scale, doesn't make it right all the time. I look at it and I see it off balance one notch and you look at it and you see it right on the money. Different eyes see different things. I have checked both of my digitals against a balance beam and all three to be in sinc 98% of the time. I trust using all three. If they're off, then they're off to the same degree and my loads will be consistent. I don't load near the max on any load so my margin of error is better than the guy that loads to the max every time. He has no margin for error and needs a certified lab scale. In my humble opinion for what it's worth. Regardless which one you use, you need to have confidence in it. I have confidence in all three of mine.
 

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I just us a cheep $30 one I got at midway.

DBChaffin said:
Probably not the most eloquent explanation/thread hijack, but I hope that made some sense. Anyone else do this?
nope but I'm going to start, thanks for the tip.
 

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I have an RCBS 505 but use one of the tiny digital scales that works great. I like to use it to double check my main scale.
 
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