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Discussion Starter #1
I have an RCBS rotary case trimmer - 2. I find it kinda hoakie to use

Don't have that much experience with the whole trimming process since I mainly do pistol and never trim them.

Rifle is a different matter and I'm trying to get up to speed on them.

I seem to have it "working" I guess but I see very little metal coming off the brass

Anyone ever use the little hand held Lee? I don't need speed....

I'm in the market I think for a different trimmer...what do ya'll use?
 

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good question. I need the same answer.
scott
 

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It's not the amount that you've trimmed off, it's the length that's left. It's possible your fired cases ain't stretched that badly. A lot depends on your factory brass, the load, and the chamber dimensions. I'd also suggest an RCBS X-die if your press has the extra space for another die.

When I was using the hand-crank designed trimmers I removed the hand crank handle and threaded enough nuts onto the shaft so that I could fit a socket wrench over the nuts and have a good hold. I added a 1/4" drive universal-joint socket to the crank end and mount a Makita cordless drill on the end with a 6" spring-shaft extension (for ratcheting around objects). The Makita would rest upside down on a couple of pieces of wood so that the driving shaft was the same height as the trimmer's shaft. The Makita would really speed the trimming up a lot.

Another thing you can do is modify the lever end so that it operates by foot-pedal--on the left side is the hand lever that operates the cam that holds the case. I would C-clamp the trimmer to the table at an oblique angle. This would allow me to dangle a rope from the lever handle to the floor without the rope touching the table. Nail a 12-15" piece of 2x4 lumber cross-ways to a short length of 4x4. The length of the 2x4 is dependent upon the size of your foot. The 4x4 should be about 8-9" long for stability. The wooden contraption should resemble a miniature see-saw, but be just about 4" uneven, so it rests on the floor like a ramp. Drill two holes in the 'high' side, the side that's not resting on the floor. Run your length of rope through it and tie it off just long enough so there's no slack in the line. Now use the see-saw like a foot pedal--pushing down with the toe end to operate the cam....

Left foot opens the cam, left hand inserts a new case, right hand operates the drill. Left foot opens the cam, right hand removes the finished case, left hand inserts a new case, RH operates the drill. 600 cases / hour, at a pretty leisurely pace.

I haven't been in the market for a case trimmer in years. I bought a Giraud trimmer and never concerned myself over other possibilities after that. I paid ~ $150 for it about 8 years ago, I think. I dunno if there even still made.
 

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I use a Forster classic. It's a little pricey for a hand-crank trimmer and the pilots aren't available by any local shops that I'm aware of. It get the job done, though. I've been very happy with it.
 

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I use the Lee hand trimmer. It'll tear up your hands if you're doing a big batch (100+). But it always puts the brass to the same spec. The mechanics are very simple and effective.

I used it along with nothing but cheap Lee equipment and my Savage will group .5 MOA (5 shots).

Give it a shot, if you don't like it, you're only out a few bucks. I know Van's keeps them and the trimmers in stock.
 

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agreeded, if you are small time reloader 50-100 the lee has worked for me. infact i need to drim some this weekend and get them ready for primers and powder.
 
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I use the Gracey power trimmer for my .223/5.56 brass and you can zip through a bunch of brass in a short time. Have to sharpen the blades after about 2,000 or so brass. Excellent trimmer but expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My cases don't need all that much trimming yet...

Problem I'm having is the 308 case turning in the #1 Collet on the RCBS Rotary trimmer..and its not suppose to spin and yeah the pilot is all the way inside the case...I've been holding the case still so it doesn't spin and its getting the job done.

Bought the el cheapo Lee today...and tried it tonight...seems to work fine with just a little pressure applied
 
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I also have a Redding rotary trimmer. I use it sometimes for small batches of brass. The collet holds the brass tight while you turn the handle. The brass is pushed into a stationary cutting blade as you turn the handle, It works very well once you get the hang of using it. When you tighten the collet, it holds the brass firmly.
 

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Next time I trim brass, remind me to try that manual trimmer. At some point, I will have to buy a trimmer and I doubt I will be able to buy a Gracey!
 
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You can try the manual Redding when you start on the next 1,000 brass that will need trimming.
(Maybe I'll let you do all 1,000 of them manually so you will appreciate what I did before I got the Gracey (4,000 rounds manually)(sore, sore fingers)
Did I mention sore, sore fingers?
In case I didn't mention it, I had really, really sore, sore fingers.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I'm only gonna load about (50 - 100) 270 Weatherby Mag a yr...so my fingers ought to not hurt all that much.

.308's and 300's might be a diff story however

anyone got any tips on how I can keep a .308 case from spinning in a manual RCBS hand crank trimmer? Pamphlet says use #1 collet for .308...I have 3 (#1, #2 and #3) of them and they all spin...Its tightened down all the way on turn handle that screws the collet down....I dunno :scratch:
 

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I'd call RCBS, tell them your problem, and request service. Likely they'll just send you another #1 collet and you can test its' machine tolerances. If it fails another call should get you an exchange at no charge. The RCBS customer service and warranty are excellent.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
OK I got another Q.

I'll use 308 Win as an example.

The trim to length is 2.005

Surely folks don't trim the case after every load..well maybe the benchrest folks do?...anyway the Q is: How far over trim to length do you let it go...say if it measured 2.009 (trim to is 2.005 in this ex) would you trim it?...

what the "trim/let it slide" rule of thumb...

Thx
 

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I have a Forster trimmer. I mounted it at right angles with the bench and it is very sharp and trims cases easily. It also inside neck reams cases and also outside neck turns cases as well. Outside neck turning makes more accurate ammo and prevents bullet squeeze. Bullet squeeze is dangerous when the loaded neck diameter exceeds recommended measurements. The problem with over sized neck diameter is, the bullet is held in the case and pressure can increase dramatically.

My friend formed some cases for a 7.65x54mm Mauser from .30-06 brass. He nearly blew up a nice 1898/09 Argentine Mauser with the reloads. The loaded neck diameter was excessive.

Doug
 

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msredneck said:
OK I got another Q.

I'll use 308 Win as an example.

The trim to length is 2.005

Surely folks don't trim the case after every load..well maybe the benchrest folks do?...anyway the Q is: How far over trim to length do you let it go...say if it measured 2.009 (trim to is 2.005 in this ex) would you trim it?...

what the "trim/let it slide" rule of thumb...

Thx
trim it once and keep records of measurements after each firing. Then you will know how many firings it should take before it gets out of spec.

ive reloaded .223 about 5 times before it starts growing close to the max length.
 
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