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Y do people not clean their guns...?? Lol it only takes a few minutes and it will save a nice gun before it turns to junk.. I collect military surplus rifles and people will have them for decades and never clean them then sell to someone else and by that time to bores have accumulated so much dirt and moisture that it will rust the barrels...
 

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I B Mr. Clean then. 😁
 
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I put my pistols in the dishwasher and rifles in the back of truck and go through the car wash. And then spray’em down with WD40
 

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I clean every time I use them. To what degree depends on the firearm and rounds fired, and whether or not the ammunition is corrosive. I keep a thorough log of rounds fired / date / location / firearm. If only a few rounds were fired the cleaning might be a wipe down, inside & out, without disassembly. Maybe a bore snake, but for some firearms cleaning the bore wears as much as firing, so the bore might only get an oil patch. Particularly match guns, I don't want to cause additional wear to the barrel of a match-grade rifle or pistol.
I don't take the action out of the stock unless the firearm has gotten wet, or after a substantial number of rounds has been fired and it is necessary to do a thorough cleaning. This in particular applies to the milsurp bolt guns I compete / hunt with, and the RIFLE, CAL. .30, M1 aka Garand. Both of the aforementioned require at least 10 rounds to re-settle in the wood for a consistent zero, once the action has been removed from the wood, then re-assembled.
In the same log I keep track of preventive maintenance. I do PM on a rotating basis for those "safe queens" and those which are only seldom fired. This prevents rust & mildew, even in the climate controlled safe I've found both. Most of the time this is just a quick inspection, wipe down as needed, replace the firearm in storage. Make a note in the log book, keep going.
Just protecting my investment. And with our defensive firearms, protecting ourselves.
 

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Only takes a few minutes.Have you ever broke down a Nylon 66.Got one one that has never been cleaned in a few decades,still shoots fine.
I took one down once......... Once. Spray some clp in all the openings works just the same. Lol.
 

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22's are best left without cleaning the bores. Well until the accuracy falls off. Called seasoning the barrel.

Do you change the oil in your vehicle every trip you make in it?

If it upsets you to buy mil-sups they have dirty rusty bores then why buy them?
 

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Most of the older pre-WW2 military surplus rifles fired rounds loaded with corrosive primers.
I have old Hirtenberger 8x56r ammo from the 1930's that still goes "BOOM" & sends its 220 grain projectile downrange into its intended target due to its stable potassium chlorate primers.
I run a boresnake soaked in hot water with just a drop or two of dishwashing liquid, then push a wet-with-water patch, followed by dry patches.
That takes care of the potassium chloride residue & allows the normal Hoppe's or Sweet's regimen of cleaning afterward.
Many of those old rifles were used in the heat of battle with targets that shoot back at you so the surviving soldier may not have had the time to clean properly.
Those old rifles were then considered secondary to more recent arms using newer technology & some countries sold them as scrap after the wars. Why should they care about bore condition?
Some collectors don't shoot their rifles & care not what the bore looks like while other collectors DO shoot their rifles & DO care about bore condition.
I shoot mine with the old, cheap surplus ammo that was available when those old rifles were scrapped.
They usually get cleaned within hours of shooting because our humid southern climate will enable the bore to begin rusting within hours of the rifle cooling down.
To each his own. It is your rifle to do whatever it is you wanna do to it.
 

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And of course don't forget the bolt face, mag well, etc. for soap & water treatment after corrosive ammunition is fired. That potassium chloride will get in all those nooks & crannies, it's hygroscopic, and as such will easily draw in water vapor from our humid climate. That's why the old 2-chamber cleaning kit bottles used by several nations had the 2 chambers to begin with: soapy water in one side, oil in the other.
 

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That is correct, HerrZnk!
Not everyone knows what is meant by "corrosive" ammo.
Don't be fooled by ads that say "mildly corrosive".
Like sodium chloride, potassium chloride crystals attract water in the air & begin oxidizing metals.
I sometimes soak my boresnake in alcohol or E85 when cleaning after water since the alcohol bonds with the water molecules & helps in removing any left over water.
When adding dish soap to the water, be very sparing with the soap.
Dish soap is usually alkaline & you don't want to send the solutions' ph to any extremes.
Same reason why you don't use dishwashing soap for installing a tire on a magnesium or aluminum wheel.
It will cause corrosion on its own.
 

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Generally wipe them down, and run a Bore Snake thru the barrel.

A lot depends on if I plan to shoot the gun again, in a short period.
If not, I will clean it pretty good.
 

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Talk of corrosive primed ammunition makes me drag out the old story of the NORINCO reps at the SHOT show...
Doug Bowser & Powers Dunaway, at the time proprietors of Great Southern Arms, stopped by the NORINCO booth at one of the SHOT shows, I believe in NOLA. They were buying pallets of ammunition. Douglas asked the rep if the ammunition was corrosive. The 2 Chinese guys spoke to each other in Chinese, then turned to Douglas and asked:
"What you want say on box?"
I like NORINCO ammunition, what's left of it, but I treat it all as corrosive.
 

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That is correct, HerrZnk!
Not everyone knows what is meant by "corrosive" ammo.
Don't be fooled by ads that say "mildly corrosive".
Like sodium chloride, potassium chloride crystals attract water in the air & begin oxidizing metals.
I sometimes soak my boresnake in alcohol or E85 when cleaning after water since the alcohol bonds with the water molecules & helps in removing any left over water.
When adding dish soap to the water, be very sparing with the soap.
Dish soap is usually alkaline & you don't want to send the solutions' ph to any extremes.
Same reason why you don't use dishwashing soap for installing a tire on a magnesium or aluminum wheel.
It will cause corrosion on its own.
True, most dish soap is alkaline. Some brands, like Dawn products, contain a buffer so that it's neither too acidic nor basic (alkaline), but any soap should be washed away, then something should be used to remove the water, as suggested above with E85. Since we're mentioning dish soap, STAY AWAY from any of those "free car washes" (ie donations accepted) you see all the time with church groups, school cheer squads, etc. if they are using dish soap - I've seen it a lot, even when I w*rked part time at AutoZone and we told them not to use dish soap. Most warm weather weekends we had one group or another use our parking lot for fundraisers. Dish soap dissolves clear coat treatments on a car! But I digress...

If you are a frequent user of corrosive ammunition, I would recommend keeping a quart solution of Murphy's Oil Soap on hand. It also works well cleaning black powder firearms. Will put a nice shine on the wood on those old milsurps as well!
 

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If you are a frequent user of corrosive ammunition, I would recommend keeping a quart solution of Murphy's Oil Soap on hand. It also works well cleaning black powder firearms. Will put a nice shine on the wood on those old milsurps as well!
Cool!
I buy the "Brillo" brand oil soap from "Dollar Tree".
It is sure mild on my hands & wood surfaces.
 
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