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Subject: Beretta TR-1(2) Trap Special, 12 Gauge, Single Barrel Shotgun

Context: Recently, the firing pin on my Beretta trap gun broke. Upon close inspection, I discovered cracks in the aluminum trigger guard. Initially, I was concerned that these cracks would pose a significant safety risk. However, upon much closer inspection, I'm no longer convinced this is the case. I would like to solicit the opinions of the membership in regards to this issue. See the images posted below for more detailed explanations.

It is my opinion that the trigger guard, apart from housing the cross-bolt safety, is a non-functioning part, and that therefore, the cracks that have appeared a superficial. But I'm not a gunsmith.

Image 1: Receiver, left side: In this image you can see the several pins which secure the fire control group, firing pin, and clocking trigger to the receiver. It should be noted that the fire control group is secured to the receiver by the pin located just above the cross bolt safety, and the upper tang screw only.
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Image 2: Receiver, top: In this image you can see the upper tang screw. This is a machine screw that secures top of the Stock Bolt stanchion to the receiver.
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Image 3: Visible cracks in trigger guard
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Image 4: Fire Control Group: In this image, you can see that the steel hammer/hammer spring body, and aluminium trigger guard, which are two separate pieces, are connected together at the rear by a small roll pin located above and slightly behind the trigger, and at the front by the hammer bushing. The pin that secures the front of the fire control group to the receiver passes through the Hammer bushing. The Stock Bolt stanchion is secured to the hammer/hammer spring body by a roll pin near the rear of the assembly. The only mounting point for the stock to the receiver is through the stock bolt stanchion. There is no connection through the wood of the stock to the receiver, aside from the stock bolt, which passes through rear of the stock.
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Image 5: Broken firing pin: I've been able to source replacements for the firing pin from Cole Fine Guns and Gunsmithing, out of Maine.
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Have you contacted Beretta?
Given, I have had bad experience with ordering parts from their website. However there are customer service lines for gunsmithing issues that I imagine might - MIGHT - connect you with an actual gunsmith. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Have you contacted Beretta?
Given, I have had bad experience with ordering parts from their website. However there are customer service lines for gunsmithing issues that I imagine might - MIGHT - connect you with an actual gunsmith. Good luck!
I have contacted Beretta and was told they have no records for this model, no parts available, and no one in their customer service department who was willing/able to assist me. I discovered this was the case early on in my ownership of this shotgun when I went looking for a fore-end bolt, as my original one was a bit stripped. Regardless, they were my first port of call during this current ordeal. However, through Beretta I was lead to omps2.it/en/, a Beretta Website of Italian origin. It was here I found my needed firing pin, but no method of ordering and having it shipped to the US. Through Omps2’s customer service, I was directed to Cole Fine Guns and Gunsmithing in Maine. It was there I was put in contact with Jim Bellegarde, a gunsmith and Beretta shotgun specialist. His assistance has been excellent, but also limited, due primarily to this guns seemingly low production numbers and short run. There just isn’t much information available for it. It’s shares some parts with other models such as the BL series and the FS-1 and the Companion series, but then, some parts seem unique to this model. It’s been a frustrating few days, to say the least.
 
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Don't know much on this particular gun but it appears that the trigger guard is removable? If so why not remove the guard and have a good smith (like Mr Bowser) solder/brase the cracks in the guard then blue the guard.
 

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Chris - as we have discussed before, that is the only Beretta like that I have ever seen (and I have seen a lot of trap guns). You were directed to excellent places for service and/or advice on the gun. Addition contacts may be Phillip Crenwelge of Phillip's Gunsmithing in Emory Texas. Bob Schultz of Targets Shotguns Inc in Henderson NC. and if you wish to pursue farther I can give addition names. Phillip can most likely make any part your guns needs. I have no clue as to the value of your gun (often times the value is to the eye of the owner) - but I suspect as you get parts made the cost could approach what you paid for the gun or more. But, I do not know.
We have also discussed you getting another trap gun LOL.... If you are wanting a single the Browning BT-99 is excellent and not expensive, (expensive is relative) or or a Perazzi TM-1. Those are single shot trap models which are around on the used market and are virtually indestructible and easily rebuildable to last a lifetime. If you want an O/U - The Browning XT, and the Beretta 680 and 682 guns are out there on the used market as well.
Browning, Beretta, Perazzi etc., trap guns are rebuildable and last a life time. There are also Remington 3200s out here on the used market too, when you can find them.
If I can let me know.
 
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Chris - I will also mention that the Remington 1100 trap and 870 trap guns are excellent and still around. Of course the old Model 12 Winchester trap guns are excellent too --- if you can find one in a price rage.
I have heard excellent reports about the new Beretta Semi Auto Comp guns ....... in fact if I were in the market for a semi auto trap gun that is he direction I would look.- with the adjustable rib and comb. However since I am am basic in the old classics to include the Winchester Super X-1 trap guns - LOL - I wont be looking. ,
 
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The old Beretta is a cool trap gun. I hate that parts aren't available easily. Beretta made that gun from 1968-71. Chris do you have the broken part of the firing pin? The trigger guard, to me, doesn't look structural and isn't holding the hammer, spring, etc. together. I wouldn't worry too much about it, solder, braze, or JB weld it, and shoot it. Bring the firing pin with you Saturday. I'd like to look at it.
 

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@Doc - Thanks for the gunsmith recommendations. I’ll definitely be touching base with them if Jim at Cole isn’t able to set me straight. I am in the market for a new (or at least new to me) trap gun and I’m definitely going to be going O/U or semi. As much as I’d love a Perazzi or a Browning, I’m afraid the wife would divorce me if I spent that much on one gun in one go. So, my budget will be more in the Rem 1100 range. I’ve actually been eying the Beretta A400 Xcel Parallel Target model. It’s not the full trap version, but it’s also a good $1K less expensive; and I don’t even mind the blue receiver. Now, if I could only find a lightly used one in good nick, I’d really be in business.

@Bert Wallace - I do have what’s left of the firing pin, though not the missing tip (that’s probably in the grass at the club). I’ll bring it along with me on Saturday, as I was already planning to bring the entire fire control group for @Doug Bowser to inspect. Instead, I’ll just bring the entire receiver. Also, speaking of Saturday, I won’t be shooting my new PPC revolver, as I’ve not had time to load any ammo for it, or take it out to find it’s zero. Hopefully, I’ll be shooting that one come December’s match. Instead, I’ll be shooting my Mk III again, and hoping I can figure out why it’s not shooting the groups it use to. That one may be the next culled from the herd, if it doesn’t start acting right.
 

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All great advice. you also take excellent detailed photos. I would consider going the soldering route if I could not locate the trigger guard. And shoot it some and monitor any further problems. The firing pin breaking does not seem to be connected to the cracks. What I have found on older guns that sometimes there are several problems that need to be corrected. I bet that you have shot it much more than the average gun owner and that you have many more years left to shoot this fine shotgun. You also might could get a machinist /company that could fabricate another trigger guard. There is a company that refurbishes western and antique guns. I have seen some of the work and it is outstanding, If I could not get it local, I would send them pics. I think Joe on the forum has sent some Ruger revolvers to them. I can't think of the name right now but I will look for it. I think they work on many types of guns. It is Turnbull restorations
 
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