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I was watching top shots the other day and noticed a few of them dry firing the Beretta pistols. I've always thought that dry firing is a no no. I wanted to get your thoughts on this. Is it OK to dry fire my pistol to get more used to the trigger pull. I have a Tarsus PT-140 but I don't think that would really matter.
 

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I shoot Glock and if dry firing hurt it then I would be in deep stuff. I dry fire almost daily with my competition Glock. IMO, striker fired guns are ok to dry fire. If you don't feel comfortable doing it, get u some snap caps. I would never dry fire a rimfire though. Others will weigh in with more info I'm sure.
 

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my poor lil ruger 10/22 has been dry fired so many times its not funny. no problems out of it yet :D

I dry fire all my guns, if your scared get some snapcaps like gunny said.
 

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Not familiar with that particular Taurus, but the rule is, if it's a modern centerfire (which yours is) gun, it's safe to dry fire.

All of my handguns have been dryfire'd literally thousands of times.

And again, if you're worried, by a set of $14 A-Zoom snap caps. They're the best quality.
 

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I wore out my finger dry firing my 442. Rimfires are diff story though. You can do the paper test on them to see if its ok to dry fire.
 

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nhstk02 said:
I wore out my finger dry firing my 442. Rimfires are diff story though. You can do the paper test on them to see if its ok to dry fire.
Off Topic But,
How many pulls does it take to wear a finger out? Is it kinda like a Tootsie Pop getting to center?
Lol. JK'ing
To really think about it, I've probably dry fired "modern pistols" about atleast a million times or more.
:lol3:
 

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Ha, you ever saw the video of Todd Jarret shooting that para about 10,000 times? It's on youtube, thats how many times.lol
 

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Dry firing rimfires is not a good idea because the firing pin slams into the back of the chamber.

With centerfires it's not a concern.
 

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I'd have to see the particular revolver. My Ruger GP100 uses a transfer bar where the hammer is flat and when the hammer falls, it slaps the transfer bar, driving the firing pin into the primer.

Some older revolvers have the "firing pin" or literally just a spike on the hammer. What kind of revolver is it?

If it's a reproduction of some old revolver, it may have the "spike" I referred to.
 

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Do not dry fire a High Standard .22 pistol. The firring pin can dent the edge of the chamber and cause problems.

Doug
 

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It depends on the design of the firearm, not how "modern" it is.

A PF9 is a modern centerfire pistol, but dry-firing it WILL cause damage.

I suggest you ask the manufacturer of the gun if it is safe to dry fire. They usually know what is best for their product.

Personally, if I have to worry about the thing falling apart during dry fire practice, I'm not keeping it. (rimfire excluded of course)
 

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A guy told me a while back that when he bought his SR9 that they said not to dry fire it. I call BS on that because it is very similar to a Glock , being striker fired, and it shouldn't hurt.
 

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The original posting asked in part, “I've always thought that dry firing is a no no. I wanted to get your thoughts on this.”. So, bear with me please while I sort of verge off to one side.

As a premise, personally I believe that dry fire practice, or its equivalent, is extremely important. As with any sport, you need to keep your skills honed as best you can.

Kathy Jackson, managing editor for Concealed Carry magazine, has a very good website (she and it have been mentioned in other topics in these MGO Forums), in which she has an article on dry fire. Take a look at: http://www.corneredcat.com/Practice/dryfire.aspx

In that article she writes, in part, “Ten to fifteen minutes is all I can safely handle; after that my mind starts to wander. As soon as your mind wanders, stop immediately. That's a sign that you are not paying attention to what you are doing...”

I tend to agree with her. I must have a very short attention span because I get bored in very short order.

What I have done is to set up some targeting in my shop and have a pair of CO2 air pistols that I use. Granted, this is not practicing with your usual firearm. On the other hand, however, you do get practice of basic principles with immediate feedback that tends to enhance interest and overcome boredom.

Years ago I had some primer-fired plastic wad-cutters that I could shoot in a revolver at a backed-up target in the living room. That probably was even better.
 

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i was reading the other day about trigger control and dry fire practice. one guy that is a champion shooter said he gets the muzzle about an inch from the wall and fixes it on a target. he then dry fires at that distance.

i thought it wierd so i tried it. let me tell you. at that distance, you notice EVERY little move of the muzzle off target. its a good way to realise how much you move when you pull the trigger.

i thought itwas pretty neat.
 
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