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Here’s a topic that might get the opinion-juices flowing. The question is not new. It got resurrected when I read an article about the new CZ 75’s.

I find it interesting that more than one acknowledged source on handguns decry the Finger-rail type of trigger guard.

For example (and not to pick on her) Kathy Jackson, managing editor of “Concealed Carry”, the publication of the USCCA, writes on her webpage (see at: http://www.corneredcat.com/TOC.aspx) regarding Finger-rail Trigger Guards…
“Placing the non-shooting trigger finger forward accomplishes nothing at all: neither recoil control, nor strength, nor accuracy are improved by it. In fact, putting that finger forward lessens the gripping strength of your non-shooting hand, which in turn weakens your entire grip.”

I’ve no reason to doubt what she says, but if she’s right why do manufacturers continue to produce handguns with the Finger-rail type of trigger guard?

I’ve had a couple.

Had a S&W Model 5906, early version with a Finger-rail type of trigger guard (or ‘finger step trigger guard’) which S&W eventually changed to the rounded trigger guard for 'ease of production'.

My Bersa 380 has the Finger-rail type of trigger guard. I find from time-to-time that I am using that rail, particularly in the winter if I’m wearing gloves. On the downside, I think a handgun with the Finger-rail type of trigger guard does not holster as smoothly as one with a rounded trigger guard. Again with the Bersa, it will seat in the shoulder holster but not smoothly. Probably the holster was designed more for the PPK (of which the Bersa is more or less a clone) with a rounded trigger guard.

Anyone have anything they want to share regarding the Finger-rail Trigger Guard?
 

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She's right.

“Placing the non-shooting trigger finger forward accomplishes nothing at all: neither recoil control, nor strength, nor accuracy are improved by it. In fact, putting that finger forward lessens the gripping strength of your non-shooting hand, which in turn weakens your entire grip.”
 

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I initially shot with my weakhand index finger on the front of the trigger guard. I was using a weaver stance and I guess it helped "pull" the gun into the strong hand. After I started competing, my grip and stance evolved to an under the trigger guard grip and a modern Isosceles stance (discussed elsewhere on the forum). There are some definite advantages to me, the extra gripping strenth mentioned as well as the ability to cam the wrist of the weak arm which makes the wrist joint stronger, I think. Most of the better shooters in USPSA/IPSC shoot with this grip, demonstrated here by Todd Jarrett.

However, there are a few notable exceptions, the most notable of which is Eric Grauffel. Eric is a French shooter that has won the last 4 World Shoots (held every three years) in Open division. He seldom loses anything he shoots, including when he picks up a Standard or Limited division gun, so it is not just because he shoots an Open gun with a comp that doesn't have as much recoil that the grip works for him. If you have some time, it is worth going to his website,http://ericgrauffel.com/, and looking under "Eric's Info" and then checking out the "Internet Videos". I recently saw the CCI Primers commercial on TV, and the El Presidente video is a classic, though it is about 10 years old or so. The weakhand index finger on the trigger guard grip obviously works for him. My suggestion would be to try it both ways and see what you prefer. Here are a couple photos of Eric with his grip:

 

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Ed Hunter said:
I’ve no reason to doubt what she says, but if she’s right why do manufacturers continue to produce handguns with the Finger-rail type of trigger guard?
I strayed a bit from the initial question with my last post. I think many shooters still like the "finger on the guard grip", whether or not it is "right" or actually does anything beneficial. There are also some aesthetic reasons I am sure, as some firearms might look funny with rounded, small trigger guards.

I will admit that I actually prefer a square trigger guard to a small rounded one. The custom 1911 I am having built now will have a squared trigger guard, even though aesthetically I like the look of a traditional rounded guard on a 1911. The reason is not to put the weak hand finger on the front of it, but to give the weak hand index finger more room underneath. If you look at the picture of Todd Jarrett that I linked above, there is not much room before his finger is "off the front of the trigger guard." Once shooting this isn't a problem, but on a draw or picking it up off a table, for example, I like having the larger flat surface to index upon as I am getting my grip. My fingers are relatively large, so that is probably part of it. More importantly though, it is basically all I have shot - Glocks, SV/STI, etc all have square trigger guards also, so that plays an important factor as well. Besides, I am building this one to shoot, not look at. A nice squared trigger guard does pretty much scream "custom" on a 1911, and I like that part, but cutting and welding on a brand new frame should probably make me more nervous than it does. I guess it is comforting knowing it is in good hands though.
 

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Just by looking at the pics, the reason his finger is where it's at is because of where his support hands thumb is. It would be a weird grip angle to have his thumb that high and his finger below the trigger guard.

I would love to ask him.
Just my 2cents.
 

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Xd357 said:
Just by looking at the pics, the reason his finger is where it's at is because of where his support hands thumb is.
Or is his thumb where it's at because of where he puts his finger? LOL. Seriously, good observation. I guess that could be considered one advantage - it gets the support hand even higher on the gun and closer in line to the bore.

Xd357 said:
I would love to ask him.
Not a bad idea, especially since no less than Rob Leatham has called him something like "the best handgun shooter in the world today". Here's another link to a video of Eric in action.

I believe Jerry Barnhart and Angus Hobdell are two other top level shooters that use the finger on the trigger guard grip. Barnhart, a highly sought after instructor, at least teaches his students to grip below the guard though. I believe he tells them below the guard is superior.

Here are a couple pictures of Jerry and Angus spitting lead:

 
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