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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are trying to set-up a RO class down on the Coast and I would like to gauge interest from fellow members here to see if there would be enough for a class. I know of 4-5 people interested so far, but really need atleast 12-15 students for the class. If you or someone you know would be interested, please respond.
Spanky, You might post on your site as well. I told Tom I would post here since alot of shooters visit here or Spanky's site.
Thanks,
 

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How much does it cost? If it's not too bad count me in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Price will be around 40-50 bucks hopefully.
RO is a Range Officer for USPSA Competition. It is not NRA certified class, but is required to be a safety range officer at the USPSA matches that a lot of us shoot at these days. If any RO's want to add other info, please do.
I'll PM spanky if he doesn't respond soon to get posted on bayoushooter.
BTW, there is a test at end of course. Maybe DBC will chime in with more info about course because I am kinda new to the RO'ing ,but want to learn since I'll be shooting and want to learn more.
 

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Just a plug for everyone down that way that are on the post about G.O.D.'s getting a class formed. They talked me into taking the class in Byram before I had even seen a ISPC shoot. I learned a great deal about the sport and the rules. I won't lie to you though, that test even open book is a doozy. You'll dig through the book for the answers but they're in there. I passed (barely) so all you south MS gunners should have no problem.
 

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As others said, this is for USPSA. If anyone is interested in an being an NRA Range Safety Officer, as a NRA Chief Range Safety Officer I can teach that course.

Need 10 rso canidates, a place to hold the course, plus fees, travel expenses and lodging.
 

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This is a great course. I took it with Sidroski in February at Magnolia. If you shoot USPSA everyone STRONGLY recommends it. You will learn a lot about the rules and the sport. Day one is all classroom, with case studies via video and photographs, (and the rules). Day 2 is on the range, running shooters, scoring targets, learning how to use scoring overlays. The instructors are FIRST RATE, TOP QUALITY people. These are the same people who run the Nationals matches every year. Troy McManus is usually the Range Master at nationals, and George Jones was a CRO this year at nationals.

I can't recommend it enough. I might even take it again...
 

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GunOneDown said:
Maybe DBC will chime in with more info about course because I am kinda new to the RO'ing ,but want to learn since I'll be shooting and want to learn more.
Sure thing. Range Officers (of which there are 4 levels) are certified by the USPSA's NROI. This is the "National Range Officers Institute" of the United States Practical Shooting Association.

NROI typically pays for travel to the class. The club putting on the class is then responsible for lodging, meals, and local transportation expenses. There are sometimes costs for classroom and/or range. These fees are totalled and divided by the number of students so cost will vary. The range mentioned above is about typical and I think pretty reasonable for what you are getting.

This class would be for a Level I Range Officer. This is the training to perform most of the officiating seen/required at a USPSA match, i.e. carry the timer, check equipment, score targets, and generally help make sure the competitors compete in a safe manner. Note that you don't have to be certified to help out with these tasks at a local match as most of you know, but there is a lot of valuable knowledge and the class is the quickest way to get it. When I took the class, I had been competing for about 2 years and had read a good bit of the rulebook. I still learned a LOT.

There are no previous requirements to take the class (other than being a USPSA member I believe, and typically you can join at the class). USPSA does prefer that you have at least some shooting experience. The more you have, the easier the class will likely be for you, but as Sidrowski mentioned above, he took the class before having shot a match. I don't know of any age requirement either, and I know some younger folks that have been certified. I think it depends more on the actual individual's maturity and ability than a set age, but you may want to check me on that if you are considering taking a young child.

Chris mentioned the specifics of the class, i.e. first day classroom, second day on the range, and he is exactly right about the qualified instructors. There aren't that many that do the classes, and they are all very good. Troy McManus is from the Baton Rouge area and does most of them in this area if he is available. He has been involved in the sport for a long time and is always an official at Nationals in some capacity or another.

After the class there is a 50 question open book exam that is taken on your own time and mailed to your instructor. Once you've become certified as an RO, there is an annual "short" exam to maintain the certification that can be taken online. If you let it lapse for more than six months, there is a "long" exam that must be taken instead, and a lapse of over a year requires taking the course again to be recertified. I will add that while the class and initial exam will take some of your time, the yearly online tests are not much of a hassle at all.

I personally highly recommend taking the Level I class if you are a USPSA shooter or are interested in the matches. If the latter, shoot at least a match or two if you can before the class. The class will teach you a lot about the rules and the sport, and it will give you confidence, both in officiating as well as shooting. The more shooters that have the knowledge, the better the matches will be as a whole. Even if you don't care to officiate, the class will be good for you in my opinion, and may make you comfortable enough to step in and help out. Volunteers make the matches work, and knowledgeable volunteers are even better whether that knowledge is from a class or years of experience. I was certified as a RO in 2002 and although I am current on my certification, like Chris I have considered taking it again just as a refresher.
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Although slightly off topic, the other levels of USPSA Range Officers are CRO (Chief Range Officer), RM (Range Master), and TD (Tournament Director).

CROs are often described as the "Sergeants of the Range Officer corps." The CRO course is supplemental training in stage/course design and range operations, and at major matches CROs are often assigned to oversee other ROs on a particular stage. You have to be a certified RO for a year before you can take a CRO class and have worked at a couple of major matches as an RO. I was certified as a CRO after a class in 2003. While the class was good, I don't think it is as beneficial as the Level I class. If one is really interested in stage design, I would recommend it. Otherwise, I wouldn't recommend it to everyone like I do for the Level I, but I would never discourage someone from taking it if they had an interest. There are now two ways to take it, in a class or via correspondence course.

RMs have extensive supplemental training in range operations, arbitrations, staff management, squadding, and the various fine points of the rules. RMs oversee the range officers at major matches. You must have a minimum of 2 years in service as a CRO in order to start the RM program, and it is year-long correspondence course that ends with service as a CRO at a National-level match before a panel of instructors. I've never gone this far personally for a couple of reasons, but it may be of interest to others. To maintain the RM certification, one is required to annually work as an RO or higher at the Nationals, CRO or higher at an "Area" or regional size match, or serve as TD or RM for a State Championship level match. I believe it is still true that there are no certified RMs or TDs in Mississippi.

TD is even more focused on match administration. It is another year-long correspondence course that ends with putting on an Area or regional level match. It has similar requirements as RM in that you must have a minimum of 2 years in service as a CRO in order to start the program and must work certain major matches to maintain the certification.
 
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