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I gotta call BS on the above flow chart. I've been around a lot of jackhammers on job sites and they are WAY louder than any of the suppressed firearms I've been around including my .50 Barrett.
 
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Blessed are the peacemakers
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I believe the chart is accurate simply because a gunshot is a very, very quick impulse noise, none of the others come close except for the nail gun but even that is much longer of an impulse because of the pneumatic nature.
A gunshot does sound quieter than most of the listed items to the ear, but hard data shows that it is louder than most (probably all, I don’t know off the top of my head) of the items listed below the suppressed firearm.
There is lots of data showing that an AR suppressed at the ear is borderline 140DB which is borderline damaging (per OSHA and .mil standards) but I shoot my 12.5” SBR suppressed with very little discomfort with naked ears but will at least put in soft (sealing) earbuds to run a jackhammer (approximately 110 DB per Google), why? Because of the difference in impulse length.
 

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From what I see a jackhammer is 130 db and a suppressed AR15 is 132.

Dangerous and Safe Noise Levels
The noise chart below lists average decibel levels for everyday sounds around you.

Painful impulse noise—Not safe for any period of time

150 dBP = fireworks at 3 feet, firecracker, shotgun

140 dBP = firearms



Painful steady noise—Not safe for any period of time

130 dBA = jackhammer

120 dBA = jet plane takeoff, siren, pneumatic drill



Extremely loud—Dangerous to hearing; wear earplugs or earmuffs

112 dBA = maximum output of some MP3 players, rock concert, chainsaw

106 dBA = gas leaf blower, snow blower

100 dBA = tractor, listening with earphones

94 dBA = hair dryer, kitchen blender, food processor



Very loud—Dangerous to hearing; wear earplugs or earmuffs

91 dBA = subway, passing motorcycle, gas mower



Moderate—Safe listening for any time period

70 dBA = group conversation, vacuum cleaner, alarm clock

60 dBA = typical conversation, dishwasher, clothes dryer

50 dBA = moderate rainfall

40 dBA = quiet room



Faint—Safe listening for any time period

30 dBA = whisper, quiet library

The noise chart was developed using the following two websites:

 

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Blessed are the peacemakers
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Lots of good data from reputable sources on YouTube for the firearms side, but nobody seems to have videos of them measuring DB of other stuff in a standardized manner.
 
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