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Need some help with a reloading question and I am hoping someone else has looked for the same thing and may have found it. I have a H&R Buffalo classic in 45/70 and I’m trying to find the max pressure the receiver can handle. I am by no means going to load it to max pressure but I just wanna make sure I’m within that safe zone. if someone has his info it would be muchly appreciated and thank you.
 

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Be careful! I’ve seen stout 45-70 loads that would cause the action to open up when it went off. That’s a clue! There’s three levels of 45-70 data, I would think that you would be good to go with the first and second levels.

J.B.

The 3 levels are:

1873 Springfield at 18,000 CUP
1886 Winchester and 1895 Marlin at 28,000 CUP
Ruger No. 1 and No. 3 at 40,000 CUP

Like Cottonmouth said, you are safe with the first two choices.

.
 

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I got a Buffalo Classic. The 1886 Winchester load is good to go. Better add weight to it. The 2nd level recoil will eat your lunch off the bench. I was shooting 405 grain flat point.. Got some FTX in 325, Hornady 300 Hollow point and Hornady 350 flat points loaded but haven't tried them yet. Crazy but my favorite caliber to shoot.
 

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I have a Knight KP-1 in 45-70 and have always had the same question regarding a safe zone. The company that made the rifle is out of business.
 

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So I used to have a Buffalo Classic and was reloading for it. I often wondered the same thing, best information I could find suggested around 30k CUP. I usually kept mine around 18,000 to 20,000 for the loads I was doing at the time. So, as others have pointed out, sticking in those first two brackets is where you'd want to go.
 

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Be aware that the break-action of the Buffalo Classic is not as strong as the 1886 Winchester/1895 Marlin lever actions.
That said, the H&R Handi Rifles have been chambered in .444 Marlin, which Hodgdon shows with a lower pressure of ~30,000 CUP, and .35 Whelen (lower pressure ~40,000 CUP).
Your shoulder may be the limiting factor in the hotter loads than the strength of the action but I wouldn't push it.
Depending on what you are trying to accomplish, you may want to look at another cartridge. The .45-70 will never fly as straight as a .44 Rem Mag or .444 Marlin.
 

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Just up your game and go with a .458WM. If you have the need for such a beast it is a good choice along with .375 H&H
 
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