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Discussion Starter #1
I'd like to store some wheat. Does anyone know where to buy it in Mississippi by the 50 lb sack. Food grade of course.
 

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I presume you can grind it. Share with the process of taking wheat to food. Maybe something I need to store is that and yeast. What would be the difference in that and cream of wheat? We're not up there in wheat consumption.
 

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My wife stores it in 5 Gallon buckets with lids...she has a high $ very high speed grinder that takes wheat and makes flour..The whine is so high pitched she wears ear plugs while grinding it.

Then you have to have a very heavy duty machine to make dough...She has about 1.5 K in the hardware just to do this...

She uses red wheat and something else..

She makes about 10 loafs at a time...puts most in freezer

check out Montana Wheat or possibly the Rainbow Co-Op in Jafrica
 

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Whole Wheat's shelf life is WAY longer than flour...that is why most who store for survival purposes use whole wheat. This of course assumes one seals it up correctly.
 

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They make special buckets and Lid removal tools...It stores about a year I guess...50 lbs goes a long way

I dunno about the winter wheat per se...I always used what I called "winter wheat" for dove fields :p

I can get some more 411 if ya'll need more
 

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With a proper liner bag for the buckets and a bit of dry ice to displace the Oxygen wheat can be packed in a manner where it can stay good for a DECADE or longer!
 

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i thought i was the only one that knew about the dry ice trick! but still if you ever wanted to plant it the efficacy starts to nose dive around the 6-10 year mark unless kept in cold storage
be friends with a farmer that plants wheat. just something to think about bag of wheat plants one acre. Good dirt can produce 40-80 bushels per acre. one bushel can make 100 loaves of bread. one bushel sells for around $7-14 bucks. If you buy from a grain elevator or a farmer ask about moisture content I wanna say 13% moisture for wheat is good.. dont quote me on that its been a long ace time since i delt with any
 

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I'm not a member of the LDS but I ordered wheat from them a few years ago.It's already packed in #10 cans.Makes great bread and biscuits.Shipping was free when I ordered.

It's kinda hard to find on their site but it's there.It's item
#06601000. Just put this number in the "quick search"
 

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+1 on the LDS. If you have an LDS friend ask them to find out when their church is planning a canning trip to the "bishop's storehouse". Its in slidell, la for this area. You may can go in with their church group and be able to purchase several types of dry goods, including wheat, in bulk or canned in the one gallon cans - at wholesale without taxes. I've done this and its worth it.

Here's a list of what is available and the prices. http://www.providentliving.org/content/display/0,11666,8133-1-4352-1,00.html Click on the US price list.
 

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Never thought about storing wheat or that I may need it for this purpose. I guess that shows ya how much we sometimes tend to rely on modern conveniences like already processed flour and things.
 

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Oh, I meant to mention that the reason its better to store wheat in the kernal form is that it will keep for over 30 years - I know - I've ate some pancakes made with wheat put up in 1964.

Processes flour will not keep that long.

Another thing - if you are going to store flour, don't worry about storing flour that is self-rising. This flour has baking powder already in it so you don't have to add it later. However, baking powder loses effect after about 5 years - so you'll end up with All purpose flour after all. Store baking soda and baking powder and oil or lard separately. ....and you young uns, learn to make biscuits if you don't know already - and memorize the recipe.

...also, unfortunately, yeast doesn't store long either. So, I'll be eating biscuits and cornbread mostly - which will be quite fine if its all I got, and superb if I can conjure up some squirrel gravy. :)
 

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Now biscuits from scratch without self rising flour I can do. I have never attempted corn bread with out self rising cornmeal but if I can make biscuits then corn bread shouldn't be to hard. Other than that I pretty much have this cooking from scratch thing down pat. My grandmothers were old school when it came to cooking so I learned from them as I grew up. Thank goodness for grandmaws or I would really be clueless. Hey what bout syrup for those biscuits? Where we gonna find trees to get that from. Those aren't easy to come by in MS.
 

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Mrs. Hammer said:
Hey what bout syrup for those biscuits?
I wish I knew. The old folk will say, cook up sugar cane into molasses syrup; but I hate the taste of that stuff. Honey is an option. I store sugar so I can make some sweets. Sugary foods is one thing I will have withdrawals from if TSHTF. Even simple little tea cakes or sugar cookies will be better than nothing.

On our last camp out with my buddies we did some experimenting with the dutch oven on the fire. We made some biscuits cowboy style from ground wheat and they turned out fine. It was my second time trying this. I've learned to not put hardly any coals under the pot. The bottoms burned the first time. Second time I used some rocks to support a standard 9" cake pan that fit inside the cast iron to keep them off the bottom. We also did a peach cobbler in another dutch oven that turned out great....but I'm getting off topic.
 

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Methos, what you talking about, we used to get that stuff down at my grandmother's neighbor's farm. Remember them grinding the juice out and cooking it up. All them old men would stay cool with a cold one and we'd come back to Jackson with a load of it.
When I used to go to the fair, I always stood in line at Jim Buck Ross' stand to get a biscuit and molasses.
Way off topic but this has gone in a few directions.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks

Thanks for the replies. I like to read "Survial Blog" and they recommend storing wheat.
Breads are my weakness. If the SHTF flour and or wheat would be good to have imho. I am of the mind to think we're in for a rough ride the next few years.

Roosty
 

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Corn is also a good storage item for down here. Untreated deer corn is edible by us and we can grow it like wildfire here. Wheat is more of a northern crop. IMHO we should look to what our grandpappys did.
 
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