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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Stopped by Gary's in Columbus today, just snooping around. Actually was looking for one of the new Springfield Hellcats to wrap my hand around. Didn't have one, so fondled some other compacts. Liked a S&W but didn't have cash on me. On the way out went by the rifle rack and there was a Henry X Model in .45Colt. $799. Felt pretty good just shouldering and working the lever a few times. Thought one of y'all here might be looking for one, so there it is.

 

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Nope! I still want my lever guns to be blued steel an wood.
 

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I am the same, lever rifles should have wood stocks, but I can see the need/want for a stainless steel rifle with black stocks, but just not for me, I really like my Henry rifles and shoot them a lot when I can, I am wanting one of the new Henry rifles with the side loading gate but it may be a little while due to the price, Henry rifles are nice but not cheap.
 

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I'm a little late weighing in, but my feeling about this series is that it may appeal to a very small group- those planning to install a can- but for that price point, I need something besides a flashlight rail to make it appealing. It doesn't do anything your other pistol-cartridge lever carbines don't already do. And like most of you, the Tupperware furniture somehow goes against nature for me. If this were done at a price point of $599, then we may have more of a place for it. Not sure if anybody makes a muzzle brake for .45 caliber, but the model offered in this line chambered in .45-70 may have more value if there is such a thing. Guess you could screw a .50 cal brake designed for the BMG on it, if you don't mind a 2 1/2 lb piece of steel as large as your fist sitting on the end of your compact lever hunting rifle...:hmm:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I'm a little late weighing in, but my feeling about this series is that it may appeal to a very small group- those planning to install a can- but for that price point, I need something besides a flashlight rail to make it appealing. It doesn't do anything your other pistol-cartridge lever carbines don't already do. And like most of you, the Tupperware furniture somehow goes against nature for me. If this were done at a price point of $599, then we may have more of a place for it. Not sure if anybody makes a muzzle brake for .45 caliber, but the model offered in this line chambered in .45-70 may have more value if there is such a thing. Guess you could screw a .50 cal brake designed for the BMG on it, if you don't mind a 2 1/2 lb piece of steel as large as your fist sitting on the end of your compact lever hunting rifle...:hmm:

45-70 X model: MSRP: $970

Lever Action X Model .45-70 | Henry Repeating Arms


Brass and walnut 45-70 sidegate. MSRP $1077
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The 1" rubber recoil pad would be a welcomed addition on that 45-70, as well! But even having said all that, I still like the brass and wood better!
Pretty sure you could get a large loop lever for the brass sidegate, and possibly the new sights also, from the Henry Pride store. Unfortunately, the store and the Warranty shop have become Covid victims. They're based in Bayonne, NJ.
 

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Oh man! I would think Williams would have some sights of some sort. I might fancy a tang peep on such a fine weapon... Depending on barrel length. Henry makes MANY variations of these guns. There is a current Long Range version with a high comb, I believe. It runs about $850 on the low end. Fine weapon!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Oh man! I would think Williams would have some sights of some sort. I might fancy a tang peep on such a fine weapon... Depending on barrel length. Henry makes MANY variations of these guns. There is a current Long Range version with a high comb, I believe. It runs about $850 on the low end. Fine weapon!
Skinner sights are the favorite for many lever gun guys.

HENRY REPEATING ARMS
 

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Thinking I want to try the 223 in the Long Ranger edition. 20" barrel with 1:9 twist. This would readily stabilize the 64 grain Bonded Nosler bullets, as well as 60gr Partitions, and probably 65gr Sierra. I could play around with this to see if I could reduce loads to hyper 22lr or low-end 22 WMR speeds. Would make a DANDY replacement when rimfires go away again over hoarding. Commercial bulk brass and some Winchester SPs, and this thing could be a formidable squirrel gun, as well as hog/yote slayer at full throttle. Definitely something to get younsters over fears of shooting loud, centerfires. Found one last night for $825 with beautiful wood!
 

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Thinking I want to try the 223 in the Long Ranger edition. 20" barrel with 1:9 twist. This would readily stabilize the 64 grain Bonded Nosler bullets, as well as 60gr Partitions, and probably 65gr Sierra. I could play around with this to see if I could reduce loads to hyper 22lr or low-end 22 WMR speeds. Would make a DANDY replacement when rimfires go away again over hoarding. Commercial bulk brass and some Winchester SPs, and this thing could be a formidable squirrel gun, as well as hog/yote slayer at full throttle. Definitely something to get younsters over fears of shooting loud, centerfires. Found one last night for $825 with beautiful wood!
Strangely enough, they make 2 models in each caliber: 223, 243, 6.5 Creedmoor, and 308. They all have 20" barrels except the Creedmoor, which has a 22" pipe. Only difference whatsoever in each caliber variation is one is offered with open sights and the other is slick-topped. What's the strange part is the prices are identical for both. I'd like to try a 243, but like 90% of everybody else, it's made in a 1:10 twist that won't stabilize the longer, newer projectiles at 243 velocities. Some, like Remington have made it in 1:9 1/4 forever, and there may be a 1:9 by somebody or 2 out there, but as far as I know, Barrett is the only one that offers it in what it should be made in. I think Browning may have corrected this a couple years ago, as they added faster twists to all their line. Too fast in some cases! I don't recall what Browning put in it's 243s, but it may have been 1:8. Don't quote me on that, and would be easy to research it, but I'll save that for another inquisitive soul.

Waiting to take this Bergara out of the stock and wipe off the release agent and get back to the range with some remakes of the samples I fired this past weekend. It's ready to go, just need to get through the honey-do's...
 
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