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What, if anything, do you do to the wood on your rifles? Not refinishing, just maintaining the original finish.
 

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When I was a member of surplusrifle.com(gone now) I remember something about cleaning with Murphy oil Soap and rubbing down with Boiled Linseed oil.
I used what ever furniture wax my wife happens to buy on all my wood stocked guns.
 
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Morte
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I use a concoction of 1 part BLO, 1 part turpentine and 1 part beeswax.

Melt the beeswax, add the other two, mix well and let sit over night. Take the paste it makes and rub it in with your hand.
 

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I just use Ballistol or such to clean and protect. I don’t put wax, finish, BLO or other on true collectors. Not so bad on a 1903 or Garand that went thru some rebuilds but it’ll hurt a K98, Swedish Mauser, Swiss Schmidt Rubin, Finn Mosin and many others collectibility.
 

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Morte
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I just use Ballistol or such to clean and protect. I don’t put wax, finish, BLO or other on true collectors. Not so bad on a 1903 or Garand that went thru some rebuilds but it’ll hurt a K98, Swedish Mauser, Swiss Schmidt Rubin, Finn Mosin and many others collectibility.
Stew,

I’m about to make another “tub” of the concoction and will send you some to try if you would like.

I use it on everything including my original muskets, and it doesn’t hurt the value. My oldest is an 1838 dated Springfield M1816
 

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Stew,

I’m about to make another “tub” of the concoction and will send you some to try if you would like.
Thanks but I better pass, like to keep them as original. If I saw one looking like it was degrading I might would match the original used finish as best I could, but so far they are fine as original (or last rearsenal as best I know) and don’t need me to add or subtract. A little oil/Ballistol wipe down from time to time. The environment they are stored in being the biggest key to longevity.
 

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Years ago I took my dad's St. Louis 12 gauge breech load shotgun to work. I collected a bucket of diesel fuel and stuck the wood parts in to soak for a few. Washed them with a stainless steel scrubby. Brought them home and left them for a month before sanding with 600 grit sandpaper. Haven't been touched since.
 

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Obviously the best thing for milsurp wood is to take a hacksaw and sporterize them all. Then charge double what they're worth at a local gun show.
 

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These stocks usually require no maintenance.
If some barrel cleaning solvents damage the finish on a shellac coated Russian rifle, you basically have to remove the finish & re-coat with new shellac but for most others with an oil finish (tung or BLO), a cloth soaked in alcohol will clean the wood.
Let air dry & follow up with Howard Feed n' Wax or Tom's mix.
 

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Personally, I don't do anything to them. They almost never see sun or moisture. Seems like the original finish along with oils from human hands over the years, keep them protected for the most part.
Think I read one time that pure tung oil can be reapplied at any time as long as that was what was used from the first application.
Disclaimer : I am NOT a woodworker by any means.:rolleyes:
 

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I use Tom's 1/3 Mix, Military Gunstock Wax, Natural Mix. It really soaks in well, it's not like car wax, smells nice too.

This is a good option. I use it for all my wood stock and it works very well. Go to the website and check out the history of the wax. He also has a formula for a wood cleaner that it fantastic.
Tom's 1/3 Mix
 
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Morte
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The Tom’s 1/3 aka Finn Mix is the same thing I listed in post 4, though I home make mine.

The old 3 part mix is even mentioned in Newell’s book “Gunstock finishing and care” from the 30s or 40s and goes into some details that the Chinese(?) have used it for several centuries, if I’m not mistaken
 

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Know this thread is few months old, but, read across this article
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Arisaka 99, noting the wood used for stock & being toxic
 
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