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I have not been able to get HP bullets to feed reliably in my Auto-Ordnance 1911, is this normal for this type of handgun?
 

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Ironworker said:
I have not been able to get HP bullets to feed reliably in my Auto-Ordnance 1911, is this normal for this type of handgun?
Yes, pretty normal. I also have an Auto-Ordnance, and have had some feed problems. Do not get the impression other 1911s are necessarily better. The design itself presents a problem because the feed ramp is actually composed of 2 parts, with a "hang-up" line in between. The ramp begins in the frame, the barrel when seated in slide forward position, forms the rest of the ramp, leading into the chamber within the barrel.

Field strip your pistol, remove the barrel, then seat it in the frame without the slide, and you will clearly see the path the bullet must slide over to enter the chamber. The juncture between the 2 parts of the ramp must feel smooth, with no "step" present. Smoothing the entire ramp is what they normally do the improve feed reliability.

Other reasons enter the mix, but the above is commonest. A second is magazine problems, usually due to poor retention of the round by the "feed lips" as the round passes it's transition from being gripped by the magazine to being released to slide up and into the chamber. As the slide pushes the round out of the magazine, the round is necessarily pointed upward at a slight angle. During this time, the head (grooved end) must slide up and behind the extractor hook, in the slide. Before giving up, or perhaps seeking a "shade-tree" gun mechanic (I'll catch flak here, for sure!), try a different magazine first.

Let us know how this works out. ALL 1911's should be able to feed virtually any bullet design. If you ever have the chance, examine the feed ramp on a Smith & Wesson pistol, like model 5906, or 4506, any 1st, 2nd, or 3rd. gen. pistol: the feed ramp is elongated, and part of the barrel, eliminating the "step" I referred to above, in 1911s.
 

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I agree with other post that the 1st thing to look at is magazines...Try several brands... I prefer the Wilson Combat 47D's...anyway I had the same problem with a Kimber Pro Carry...Used to call it my $1000 jamamatic...Found a good gunsmith who did some "reliability" work and it eats anything now.

1911's were made to shoot 230 gr Ball...not hollowpoints...jus the way it is...fortunately many gunsmiths make a living "tuning" the best pistol ever made. PM me if you want to know the name of the gunsmith I used.

Best of Luck
 

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One more thing...if its a new 1911...you probably need to shoot 500 - 1000 rds through to "break it in"...you should be able to get that done on a Saturday :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, it could be the maggs as some feed better than others, sounds like a good excuse to buy more (you can never have too many).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I also have a 400 cor-bon aftermarket barrel (also from Auto-Ordnance) what do you think about this cal. as compared to the 45?
 

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I have a mil-spec springfield that will shoot my handloaded HP's well. I had to adjust the seating depth to make them work, and they are seated a bit deeper than a 230 gr ball round. I have put about 500 rounds of HPs through it without a hiccup, provided I do routine cleaning and lubricating.
 

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give golden saber hp's a try they have one of the roundest hp's i can think of.. I keep Rangers loaded in my kimber and love them, zero feed issues so far
 

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HPs in 45ACP

Hollow points are known for poor expansion in .45 because of it's low velocity compared to smaller calibers. To over come that, the "flying ashtray" bullet was developed which had a huge hollow in it, but fed very poorly because of little roundness on front of the bullet. The design is no longer in production, but some old stocks of those bullets may still be available.

If anyone wants the spec. on them, let me know, and I'll look it up in the shop.
 

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The hollowpoints/softpoints that I've found to work most reliably in a 1911 (I've got two - a Kimber Custom II and a basic Rock Island) are the ones that maintain as close to the same profile as the original 230 FMJ w/ the exception of the HP/SP nose itself. The straight-sided HP/SP's that have the "truncated cone" profile are WAY more problematic.
 
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