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WJTV 12 News

It’s a sad state of affairs when a man can’t even enjoy the serenity of his own front yard without worrying about some thug walking up and robbing him.

This is what I showed my wife today when she asked why I keep my gun on my hip from sun up to sun down, 365 days a year, even when I’m in or around my own property.
 

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WJTV 12 News

It’s a sad state of affairs when a man can’t even enjoy the serenity of his own front yard without worrying about some thug walking up and robbing him.

This is what I showed my wife today when she asked why I keep my gun on my hip from sun up to sun down, 365 days a year, even when I’m in or around my own property.
My wife has asked me the same question. Since we are about 1/4 mile off the road thru the woods, there isn't a remote chance of anyone even being a witness to something like this. That being the case, I feel obliged to have adequate security, and be armed the same as you.
 

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Same reason I put a .380 in my pocket every morning when I put my pants on. Funny, my wife has never questioned why I carry it or why I put something bigger on my hip under my sports coat whenever I'm attending a meeting where the public can easily access it...'course she has her own gun.
 

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Same reason I put a .380 in my pocket every morning when I put my pants on. Funny, my wife has never questioned why I carry it or why I put something bigger on my hip under my sports coat whenever I'm attending a meeting where the public can easily access it...'course she has her own gun.
My wife carries her revolver whenever we aren’t together away from home. But at home, she keeps it locked in the Pistol safe on her dresser, to keep it away from chirens. She says that “I don’t want to live somewhere that I feel I must go armed all the time. If it comes to that, we’ll move.” I respect her opinion, but make sure I’m around when she and the sprout are outside. I’ve also convinced her to keep her snubby on her when out of doors if I’m away from home or when they take walks or ride bicycles. She obliges, more to shut me up, I think, than out of any feeling of need for her weapon in those circumstances.
 

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I'm packing heat even when I mow the yard. I can just imagine someone stopping their car and robbing me as I mow near the road A shootout would ensue.
Mowing the yard,weedeating,going to the mailbox,sitting on the front porch drinking a cold one, Watching TV. Anywhere I am I have mine with me.
 

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Let's go shoot some, we dont want to wound anything.
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I carry first for rattlesnakes done here.I carry for bigger town snakes anywhere I go. Been carrying in truck since the 70s. Now I have at least one one me.
I live appox 23 miles from town. But I had a friend visiting me one day say; I would be scared living down here alone with your gun collection. I told him first they have to get past my dogs. Next I will shoot them. I probably would not have wanted to shoot someone when I was in my 20s. But I am too banged up to do much fighting, but I am still proficient with pistols. I have worked too hard to get here and I don,t plan to just let a stranger steal it.
 

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Mowing the yard,weedeating,going to the mailbox,sitting on the front porch drinking a cold one, Watching TV. Anywhere I am I have mine with me.
Funny you mentioned weedeating...that’s reminds me of a funny story. A couple years back my wife’s uncle was weedeating our by the road in his yard in Brandon, when a guy pulled in on a motorcycle. Seems he was pretty irate that some grass had been thrown on his bike when he drove by. There was no calming him down and the guy tried to swing on wife’s uncle who was still holding a running weedeater. He missed, then got popped in the mouth with the weedeater head. He they wound that thing up and commenced to weedeating the hell out of that guy’s face. He suddenly forgot all about the few blades of grass that had hit his bike and got up out of there.
 

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Funny you mentioned weedeating...that’s reminds me of a funny story. A couple years back my wife’s uncle was weedeating our by the road in his yard in Brandon, when a guy pulled in on a motorcycle. Seems he was pretty irate that some grass had been thrown on his bike when he drove by. There was no calming him down and the guy tried to swing on wife’s uncle who was still holding a running weedeater. He missed, then got popped in the mouth with the weedeater head. He they wound that thing up and commenced to weedeating the hell out of that guy’s face. He suddenly forgot all about the few blades of grass that had hit his bike and got up out of there.
Sadly, in liberal states, your wife's uncle would be sued for everything he's worth and arrested for assault.
 

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Jackson Ms. has been on my “Cities To Avoid Listing” for over 50 years. Last time I stopped there en route to Gulfport my car was keyed and the convertible top cut. Called the police and on their arrival was told that I should have been more selective in choosing a motel and/or area of the city to stay.....
 

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Sorry but that’s self defense any way you look at it. He was on his own property when angrily approached by a stranger who initiated the violence.
Not in New York if the gun owner fails to meet ALL of the government's requirements to possess a gun---something VERY difficult and expensive to do:

This New York Man Got Arrested After Defending His Own Home

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New York Man Got Arrested After Defending His Own Home

look to the case of Ronald Stolarczyk of Oneida County, New York. He’s now facing felony charges for lawfully protecting himself against criminals without first getting the county’s permission to possess a handgun in his home—something that would cost him hundreds of dollars and months of paperwork.

The 64-year-old Stolarczyk was “minding his own business in his kitchen” one day when he heard voices coming from his garage. Stolarczyk tried simply waiting for the intruders to leave, but the two assailants soon ascended the stairs and attempted to enter his central living space.

Stolarczyk then yelled at the burglars to leave, hoping that knowledge of his presence would scare them away. The burglars were undeterred by his warning, and one even aggressively advanced toward him.

Stolarczyk now feared for his life, both because his home had previously been broken into and because he was aware of recent home invasions that resulted in the death of the homeowner.

Stolarczyk quickly retrieved his deceased father’s .38-caliber Rossi revolver and fired several rounds at the burglars, both of whom were killed.

After making sure he was safe from all threats, Stolarczyk immediately called the police and walked to the far end of his driveway to wait for their arrival.

Once they arrived, the responding officers investigated the incident and the Oneida County district attorney concluded that the shooting was likely justified, and that Stolarczyk would not face homicide charges.

The district attorney, however, charged Stolarczyk with felony criminal possession of a firearm.

The gun Stolarczyk used had been legally owned by his father, who had properly registered the revolver and lived with it in the same house where the shooting took place.

Stolarczyk came into possession of it after his father died and left him the gun, and nothing legally prohibited him from possessing firearms.

The problem was that he failed to obtain his own handgun permit and register the gun in his name.

Thus, under state law, this otherwise law-abiding citizen was “guilty” of a Class E felony punishable by up to four years in state prison and the permanent loss of his Second Amendment rights.

Additionally, the local government seized possession of Stolarczyk’s house, claiming it was in violation of local housing codes, purportedly because he could not afford running water or electricity and kept the house full of old electronics.

All of this happened because Stolarczyk—who couldn’t even afford a standard cellphone plan—failed to properly jump through all the hoops necessary to gain the government’s permission to possess a firearm in his home for self-defense.

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That will be the case in Mississippi (and all other states) in about 25 years.
 
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