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MSGO Court Jester
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That's a nice looking 'office', with a great view.
 

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μολὼν λαβέ
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I do believe they're Red Wing steel toe boots, steel toed boots are required.
Look like Ariat brand steel toe boots......;)
 
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Discussion Starter #8
You need ask him for a ride one day. Maybe get a tan on the deck. Maybe drop a few lines behind the ship.
Last time we saw him & he was allowed off the ship, was in Southwest Pass, LA, IIRC. He came off & we bought him dinner. I started to walk him back to his ship, wanted to take a photo-it was night and it was lit up like a Christmas tree. He wouldn't let me on the dock nor take photographs, security was all around and that was streng verboten! Had to wish him well and send him back on his way.
I'd love to be on that ship & put a few lines in the water, especially as they round the keys.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Look Mom...……….. No hands on the steering wheel.

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He had to manually steer that big a&& tanker to do a "man overboard" drill last week, since he was the person in charge at the time. He elected to do a simple circle instead of a more complicated 'Williamson' turn and was already beside the dummy they were supposed to retrieve when the captain started b*tching; the first mate and others on the bridge stood up for our Junge and told the captain he was wrong, the decision was correct in his choice of maneuvers to retrieve the 'man overboard'. The captain shut up and went back to bed...der Junge can explain it in much more (colorful) detail once he's back on dry land. ;)
3 Important Man Overboard Recovery Methods Used At Sea
 

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Williamson turn is meant to kick the stern and prop wash away from man in the water, prop wash is like swimming in the Mississippi river at flood stage.
Wish I would have saved some of the fish pics I had running to San Juan. Keys are ok for ship trolling, caught a lot of dauphin, and barracuda. Best was between the Bahamas and Cuba, caught lots of yellow fin tuna, big Wahoo, sail fish, and marlin. We had the spots marked, and always seemed to have boiler problems in those areas, would have to slow down for repairs, usually about 7-8 knots. Old steam ships are great because we could do the repairs at sea, new motor ships need engine repairs at the dock, and can not be run at low speed for an extended period of time.
 

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He had to manually steer that big a&& tanker to do a "man overboard" drill last week, since he was the person in charge at the time. He elected to do a simple circle instead of a more complicated 'Williamson' turn and was already beside the dummy they were supposed to retrieve when the captain started b*tching; the first mate and others on the bridge stood up for our Junge and told the captain he was wrong, the decision was correct in his choice of maneuvers to retrieve the 'man overboard'. The captain shut up and went back to bed...der Junge can explain it in much more (colorful) detail once he's back on dry land. ;)
3 Important Man Overboard Recovery Methods Used At Sea
Teaching an old dog new tricks:D
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Ship was moving so slowly, 8 knots IIRC; Williamson would've taken >30 minutes, der Junge did it in about 10-12 so the bridge crew took his side (he was getting 'graded' on this, if I understand correctly) so all is well that ends well. He does have more common sense than his Vater.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Williamson turn is meant to kick the stern and prop wash away from man in the water, prop wash is like swimming in the Mississippi river at flood stage.
Wish I would have saved some of the fish pics I had running to San Juan. Keys are ok for ship trolling, caught a lot of dauphin, and barracuda. Best was between the Bahamas and Cuba, caught lots of yellow fin tuna, big Wahoo, sail fish, and marlin. We had the spots marked, and always seemed to have boiler problems in those areas, would have to slow down for repairs, usually about 7-8 knots. Old steam ships are great because we could do the repairs at sea, new motor ships need engine repairs at the dock, and can not be run at low speed for an extended period of time.
Yeah I'd hate to be caught in the prop wash. His ship in dry dock:
IMG_0552.JPG
As the line goes in the Pixar movie "Finding Nemo",
"That's a really big butt!"
 
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