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I have been a fan of military rifles since 1956. My first Milsurp rifle was a Lee-Enfield No 1 Mk III* mfg in 1918 at Enfield Lock. I sporterized it long ago and used it to kill deer and one 280 pound black bear (in NY). I still have it and shoot it often with cast bullets.

My focus on collecting Milsurp rifles is accuracy. Our club shoots CMP Garand and Vintage Military Bolt Action Military Rilfes. If a rifle I own does not shoot 5 shots into 1.5 to 1.75" on the bench at 100 yards, I trade it off. I seldom shoot milsurp ammo. There are some exceptions:

MEM .303 and .30 M2 and 7.62x51 NATO Ball
Svenska Metallverken 6.5x55 and 7.62x51 NATO Ball
USGI Ball in .30 Carbine, .30 M2, 5.56mm and 7.62x51 NATO
Bulgarian 7.62x54R marked 10-53
Norma 6.5x55 and 7.62x51 NATO
Radway Green 5.56mm and 7.62 NATO Ball RORG headstamp

I often wonder why Countries that are still using a military caliber in their arsenals, would surplus large quanitities of that caliber ammunition. It seems to me that they would NOT sell off the best lots first. Therefore I don't trust most milsurp ammo on the market today. I reload for all the military rifles I own and I believe the ammunition I reload is far superior to most milsurp ammo.

The rifles I have had and do own that seem to have the highest level of accuracy are:

1903 and 1903-A3
M1 Garand
1896 Swedish Mauser
Swiss 1911 rifles,1911 carbines and K31 Carbine
Finnish M27, M28, M28/30, M39, M91/30 by Tikka
Russian Izhevsk M91/30 with proper ammo.

All the rifles mentioned will usually shoot perfect scores at 200 yards on the SR target. Especially with reloaded ammunition.

Doug Bowser
 

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I do not classify myself as a Milsurp collector; however, I do have the tendancy to "accumulate" some of them! My interest lies in the US military rifles from the years gone by. As you can see from my avatar, I was infantry with the US Army. Also being a history buff of some sort, the infantry weapons of WWI and WWII have always peaked my interest. I am no expert -- but do own probably a lot more than I need to.

It first started with the M1 Carbine. A cousin of mine had an Underwood that I traded for many years back. The old war movies like the "Longest Day," brought forth the itch to own a Garand. CMP can to the rescue!! After getting the first Garand, I decided I needed one of each of the manufactures (Springfield, Winchester, - still looking for the IHC) -- then it was one from each year of the WWII -- then it was one for pre-Pearl Harbor -- then one or two representing Korean War -- You now get the drift!! .... Of course, there had to be a WWII bayonet for each of 'em!!

I could not leave that one Underwood carbine alone in the safe with all those Garands -- Along came the Inlands, Winchesters, Standard Products, Rockolas, Quality Hardwares, IBMs, and National Postal Meters.

Of course, any accumulation needs an M1903A3 and several M1917s (Winchester & Remington).

When I went in the Army in 1971, we were issued the M16. I do like the weapon, but the Garand and '03s are made of the old "wood" and "steel." BOY, if they could only talk!!
 

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Ironworker said:
Do you ever display your collecton? That would be worth paying to see!
Thanks for the comment -- again, I just "accumulate" these things!! They are all mixmasters and have been through US Army Arsenal rebuild stations through the years ... Rarely get 'em all out at one time; maybe once a year or so. I did take all the gararnds to the range a few months ago and ran a couple clips through each of them -- then to the house to clean 'em all -- want do that again!!

I will post some pictures from time to time as the subjects come up ... again, thanks for the kind comments.
 

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Waffennarr
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Just a comment as to "mixmasters" - if you do come across an M1 Garand or M1 carbine for that matter, with "all original" (ie matching) parts, for sale at a 'premium' price, keep your money. Someone has scraped together parts from the same mfg. and pieced it together. Bottom line: if a rifle was used, parts were replaced as needed. A mixmaster is a more honest specimen of what our fathers and grandfathers used! Not a bad thing!
 

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Could anyone put it into words how a Finnish trigger on a 91/30 would improve its accuracy? I can feel a HUGE difference in the pull; much, much smoother with easier break.
 

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Waffennarr
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Tree of Liberty said:
Could anyone put it into words how a Finnish trigger on a 91/30 would improve its accuracy? I can feel a HUGE difference in the pull; much, much smoother with easier break.
You can see this illustrated in Doug Bowser's book Rifles of the White Death. A Collector's and Shooter's Guide to Finnish Military Rifles 1918 - 1944. And Doug did the replacement on that one, send him a PM & I'm sure he'll be more than happy to explain it.
Glad you are enjoying that rifle!
 

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Like our DRMO, why do they sell off really good or new stuff? To keep the people who produce it in business, same with the U.S. NAVY and ships.
 
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