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Im ashamed....I have never even shot my ar through the iron sights. I have always used an optic...while i repent and have decided to learn how to shot the thing proficient with the irons.

heres my question. The small peep and the larger peep on the rear...tell me about when I would use one over the other.
 

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The larger one is for quicker target acquisition at closer distances while the smaller is for more accurate shooting at longer distances.
 

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JMS39339 said:
The larger one is for quicker target acquisition at closer distances while the smaller is for more accurate shooting at longer distances.
thanks man. that was my first assumption...but ive gotten into trouble for assuming in the past ha. thanks
 

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I never liked iron sights on say the ruger 10/22 and other types until i got my AR and when i learned how to use them its fun, really fun.

The Garand is the same way, learn how to get the same hold and sight picture everytime and its a whole new ballgame :cheers:

I dailed in 675yds on the rear of the Garand Saturday and nailed a 20" gong at 664yds first shot.. :gun:
 

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learn the IRONS and you can run and gun really fast.
I only use IRONS on my AR's, It's not a match rifle, it has an intended purpose and i practice with it like that, if it were a hunting/benchrest rifle, I'd put optics on it. You should be able to comfortably shoot 300yds with the IRONS. Nonnies just touched a little and seems to be a rifle efficianato, but hits intended target way out there. We may even read about him in history one day shooting the GARAND over a mile (dream big or don't waste time right).
 

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I figured someone would mention this but no one has, so...

The mil-spec AR-15 apertures, large and small, are not on the same plane. The larger is for shots from 0-200 meters and is for faster acquisition and/or moving targets at close range. It is used all the way "down" in the adjustment range or when the the 3 is aligned with the mark on the left side of the receiver. The smaller aperture is for 300 meters and farther, I believe. When you shift from one to the other, there is an elevation change that needs to be taken into account.

This is one reason that "same plane apertures" have become very popular. Many companies make them and a quick google search will turn up tons of info. This is not what was originally intended, but it allows the shooter to swap back and forth without experiencing the elevation change so the same zero can be used.

There is some good info on zeroing an AR based on the military methods here: http://ar15zeroing.com/

I have to admit, you guys are making me want to put the irons back on my AR. I used to really enjoy shooting with them, but after seeing the advantage of a low power optic in 3-gun or multigun competition, I haven't gone back...
 

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GunOneDown said:
learn the IRONS and you can run and gun really fast.
I only use IRONS on my AR's, It's not a match rifle, it has an intended purpose and i practice with it like that, if it were a hunting/benchrest rifle, I'd put optics on it. You should be able to comfortably shoot 300yds with the IRONS. Nonnies just touched a little and seems to be a rifle efficianato, but hits intended target way out there. We may even read about him in history one day shooting the GARAND over a mile (dream big or don't waste time right).
Uh oh, you just gave me an idea...
Im gonna try that this summer when its nice and hot with no wind :cheers:
Who wants to come laugh... i mean watch..



DBChaffin said:
I figured someone would mention this but no one has, so...

The mil-spec AR-15 apertures, large and small, are not on the same plane. The larger is for shots from 0-200 meters and is for faster acquisition and/or moving targets at close range. It is used all the way "down" in the adjustment range or when the the 3 is aligned with the mark on the left side of the receiver. The smaller aperture is for 300 meters and farther, I believe. When you shift from one to the other, there is an elevation change that needs to be taken into account.

This is one reason that "same plane apertures" have become very popular. Many companies make them and a quick google search will turn up tons of info. This is not what was originally intended, but it allows the shooter to swap back and forth without experiencing the elevation change so the same zero can be used.

There is some good info on zeroing an AR based on the military methods here: http://ar15zeroing.com/

I have to admit, you guys are making me want to put the irons back on my AR. I used to really enjoy shooting with them, but after seeing the advantage of a low power optic in 3-gun or multigun competition, I haven't gone back...

I didnt know that about the flip sight.. i never use the close range one tho.
I let my friend borrow it in the hi power match saturday and it only took 2 clicks up to be on at 200.
Guess i better get back to sighting it in the right way and just practice with it.
 

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When shooting my AR, I usually use the small peep hole. Even at close distance. The only reason I do this is because if I go from CQB to a 350 yard shot I don't want to have to fiddle with to much.
 
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