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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Saw one of these recently, matte blue steel, made in Germany. Wondering if anyone has experience with these. Seems well made but I've had bad experience with a previous Walther .22 pistol (P22) and don't want to shell out $350 only to have a jam-o-matic.
TIA!
 

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I've often wondered about the Bersa version myself. So will be interesting to see what is said about the PPK/S.
 

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Danged ole' Hermit...
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Saw one of these recently, matte blue steel, made in Germany. Wondering if anyone has experience with these. Seems well made but I've had bad experience with a previous Walther .22 pistol (P22) and don't want to shell out $350 only to have a jam-o-matic.
TIA!
I've often wondered about the Bersa version myself. So will be interesting to see what is said about the PPK/S.
DC7 said:
I was just asking about one of these the other day for a buddy here. Interested in hearing what folks think about it too.
I have some rather limited experience with an example of the current production Walther PPK/S .22 pistol... so here goes... and this is one my cousin bought recently...

As a disclosure, I’ve only handled his and not fired it… and he’s only apparently fired it one or two times. Don’t think he ran many rounds thru it either but no hiccups at all and clearly seems to prefer a steady diet of CCI Mini-Mags and Stingers over “less hot” .22lr rounds. All the "reviews" express this same ammo preference too.

It sure is a fine looking pistol in your hands and appears to be very high quality... the fit and finish is exemplary on the one I examined.

Frames and slide aren’t steel though… it’s Zamak… a zinc alloy… commonly referred to as a type of “pot metal”.

Same metal used, regardless if whether you select the all black version or the shiny "nickel" looking version.

From Wiki…

“Zamak (formerly trademarked as ZAMAK and also known as Zamac) is a family of alloys with a base metal of zinc and alloying elements of aluminium, magnesium, and copper.”

The spelling of aluminum in the above quoted definition is the “Brit” way of spelling it… I didn’t change it since it’s a “quote”… :cool:

Barrels and I’m sure most small parts are steel, however… and you got to ask "why", of course, to the choice of a "pot metal" in the frame and slide... o_O

From what I understand, Walther was concerned with reciprocating mass and cycling/timing issues of the slide… and trying to keep weight and metal strength where it needed to be in designing and making this .22 version of their Walther PPK/S. There were evidently some known frame or slide cracking issues with an earlier version of the PPK .22, which did not use "Zamak" metal, but conventional metals of a very thin design.

The Walther PPK/S .22 weighs a tad more than the very similar Bersa Thunder .22, which has a steel slide and aluminum alloy frame... e.g. - 22.4 oz. vs. 18.9 oz.

One can only hope that German “pot metal” is good stuff, eh? ;)

(I did some checking up on this… there’s various “grades” of this stuff… and only the better grades should be used by the firearms industry.)

Only comes with one (1) 10-rnd magazine... and extra Walther branded factory mags seem to be readily available at about $25 to $30 a pop.
 

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Danged ole' Hermit...
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The Walther PPK/S .22 is a "blowback" action design too.

Just like the Bersa Thunder .22 pistol.

And for a manufacturer to get a blowback .22 rimfire semi-auto pistol to reliably and properly cycle and all... that is when the entire slide "reciprocates" and moves to the rear... is quite a "tricky feat" as I understand.

The only way Colt was able to do this with their Service Model Ace "M1911" pistol, which used a conventional steel slide, was by incorporating a "floating chamber"... borrowing this feature from "Carbine" Williams' famous design. Their earlier "Ace" (not named a Service Model Ace... but simply "Ace") used an aluminum alloy slide as I understand.

Just saying. :)

I'm also interested in that Bersa example... along with the Walther .22 pistol... and what I have read about the Bersa has been positive. It does appear to "retail" at a much "better" price point too... about a $100 less to be exact!!!

Buy one of each!!! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info.
Yeah it does feel quite "beefy" so I figured to cycle it would have to have pretty hot ammunition, which usually means a trade off in accuracy. Either that or start tinkering with the recoil spring, which I'm not sure I'd want to do myself. Did remind me so much of the PPK/S stainless 9mmKurz I had back in the 80s that I felt a bit of nostalgia holding it in my hands...I'll see. Will check the Bersa as well, didn't think about that one.
 

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Very nice review Cliff!!!
IIRC the Remington "Gallery" model 550-1 used a floating chamber as well. (.22s-22l-22lr- very complicated recoil springs in that baby!)
Oh! Shooting galleries at the county fair or local carny, those were the days.
 

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Danged ole' Hermit...
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Thanks for the info.
Yeah it does feel quite "beefy" so I figured to cycle it would have to have pretty hot ammunition, which usually means a trade off in accuracy. Either that or start tinkering with the recoil spring, which I'm not sure I'd want to do myself. Did remind me so much of the PPK/S stainless 9mmKurz I had back in the 80s that I felt a bit of nostalgia holding it in my hands...I'll see. Will check the Bersa as well, didn't think about that one.
You betcha, HerrZnk... :)

That Walther PPK/S 22 was an impressive looking .22 semi-auto pistol. It felt rather nice in my hands too... and I wouldn't hesitate to buy one myself.

I'm very interested in the Bersa offering also... and if it runs "right" and feeds reliably with most .22lr ammo choices... it would prove to be irresistible at its current "selling prices" as I've seen online.

As to fit & finish and quality of manufacturing... I expect it to be right on par with Bersa's .380 ACP Thunder offering... which isn't too shabby itself (considering too what it cost to bring one home!).

Likely either Bersa is a real "sleeper" in the market and often too easily overlooked and dismissed by many when pistol shopping in those two calibers.

Just my opinion there.
 

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Morte
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Any idea of who the “marketer” is? (I’m guessing it is one of the newer versions)

Interarms? S&W? Or Walther?

The S&Ws I’ve handled wasn’t of the quality (the were made in Maine) of the the old Interarms (made by Ranger in Gadsden AL) or the Manurhins from France.

I understand that in late 16 or early 2017 Walther took over manufacturing’s again in Arkansas (Ft Smith?) but I have yet to see or handle one of these.

All the PP series in .22 that I have shot was from the pre S&W days and I would have no issue with buying any of the earlier manufactured ones.
 

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Very nice review Cliff!!!
IIRC the Remington "Gallery" model 550-1 used a floating chamber as well. (.22s-22l-22lr- very complicated recoil springs in that baby!)
Oh! Shooting galleries at the county fair or local carny, those were the days.
Thanks for the kind words, Quickeye... :)

I didn't know about that Remington "Gallery" model 550-1... and I do appreciate your telling about that one!

I will attest that the Colt Service Model Ace is a very reliable shooter and seems to not be too finicky regarding .22lr ammo choices either.

Yes... those were the days! Do the county and local fairs still offer "shooting galleries"???
 
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Danged ole' Hermit...
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Any idea of who the “marketer” is? (I’m guessing it is one of the newer versions)

Interarms? S&W? Or Walther?

The S&Ws I’ve handled wasn’t of the quality (the were made in Maine) of the the old Interarms (made by Ranger in Gadsden AL) or the Manurhins from France.

I understand that in late 16 or early 2017 Walther took over manufacturing’s again in Arkansas (Ft Smith?) but I have yet to see or handle one of these.

All the PP series in .22 that I have shot was from the pre S&W days and I would have no issue with buying any of the earlier manufactured ones.
vr1967... as I understand this new Walther PPK/S 22 is a 100% Walther in-house made and marketed pistol. Don't think it had any other markings or roll stamps on it save for Carl Walther of Germany!!!

 

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Morte
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vr1967... as I understand this new Walther PPK/S 22 is a 100% Walther in-house made and marketed pistol. Don't think it had any other markings or roll stamps on it save for Carl Walther of Germany!!!

So it’s a Umarex gun, who have owned the licensing and manufacturing rights since the 90s. it’s a Ft Smith built gun then.

Will email a buddy who works there to see what all is produced there besides the PPK and PPK/s and the Colt M4 .22s.
 

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So it’s a Umarex gun, who have owned the licensing and manufacturing rights since the 90s. it’s a Ft Smith built gun then.

Will email a buddy who works there to see what all is produced there besides the PPK and PPK/s and the Colt M4 .22s.
I've not seen any info on this part myself... the example in the photo has "Made in Germany" stamped on the slide... but I would be highly interested in what your friend has to say!!! Thanks... :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
So it’s a Umarex gun, who have owned the licensing and manufacturing rights since the 90s. it’s a Ft Smith built gun then.

Will email a buddy who works there to see what all is produced there besides the PPK and PPK/s and the Colt M4 .22s.
The one I handled at Academy yesterday did also have the stamp on the left side (as in the photograph) "MADE IN GERMANY". Front right slide had the Arkansas stamp, but going by BATFE regs / US law, if it says "MADE IN GERMANY" then it was hergestellt in Deutschland, even lists ULM/DO for the city of Ulm an der Donau(Danube) river. Here's a view of the right side which shows the AR stamp:
Firearm Gun Trigger Gun barrel Gun accessory
 

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Danged ole' Hermit...
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The one I handled at Academy yesterday did also have the stamp on the left side (as in the photograph) "MADE IN GERMANY". Front right slide had the Arkansas stamp, but going by BATFE regs / US law, if it says "MADE IN GERMANY" then it was hergestellt in Deutschland.
Thanks, HerrZnk!!! :)
 

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Morte
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It’s all about licensing. The Walther family hasn’t even been involved with the company since the 80s or so.

But I’m no expert, though I have owned about 30 of the PP series over the years.

This one was made in France, yet it is marked Ulm.
Wood Door Wood stain Door handle Metal


Yet I’ve owned another that was very close in sn and same year of manufacture that was marked “Made in W. Germany” on the slide, but was clearly made in France. Will see if the collector that I sold it to still has it and will send pictures. It was a MINT (probably unfired since it left the factory)

So are the Ft Smith guns marked “Made in USA” ?
 

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I had a PPK/S in the late seventies early eighties marked made in Germany. Wish I still had it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
It’s all about licensing. The Walther family hasn’t even been involved with the company since the 80s or so.

But I’m no expert, though I have owned about 30 of the PP series over the years.

This one was made in France, yet it is marked Ulm.
View attachment 76466

Yet I’ve owned another that was very close in sn and same year of manufacture that was marked “Made in W. Germany” on the slide, but was clearly made in France. Will see if the collector that I sold it to still has it and will send pictures. It was a MINT (probably unfired since it left the factory)

So are the Ft Smith guns marked “Made in USA” ?
That's the company that holds license to the Walther name/design for marketing, think of the "TRUMP" hotels that have no involvement from the Trump family other than to use their name.
How do you know if a pistol was made in France if not so marked? If it was, and nevertheless is so marked, (and imported after '68) it is illegally marked as being manufactured in Ulm under US law. There was also a gray area with Walther and FN parts manufactured in Germany during the war but not assembled until after the war, mostly in France, Belgium, and Portugal. There one gets into the debate as to the difference between "manufactured" and "assembled". I notice this even on my w*rk clothes nowadays: "assembled in the Dominican Republic using US manufactured materials". The visible proofmark is IIRC a German proofmark.
You are of course correct about the licensing, I was referring to where the firearm was actually produced & assembled.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I contacted Walther and asked where these are produced. I'll let y'all know what they say, now I'm curious...
 

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The only PP series I have really fooled with are my 80's vintage PPKs that I converted to 9mm Luger and a buddy's Walther in .22lr from the same vintage. Mine didn't have any feed issues BUT before I ever shot it I tore it down and stoned all sharp edges-there were a lot, and polished the ramp/throat area because they had a reputation for feeding problems at that time. I haven't ever had a problem. Buddy's .22 was a bit finicky at first but fixed it with the above treatment.

As far as the Bersa's go I personally feel they are a bit of a hidden gem. Bought my oldest daughter a .380 as her first handgun. Out of the box no problems and she still has it. She's married and has two kids of her own now who I have no doubt will be shooting it before long.
 
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