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I'm trying to nail down the identity of a revolver I picked up a while back. It's a six-shot double action revolver with a 4 1/4" octagon barrel. It's marked P.Webley & Son on the top strap and 442 on one of the barrel flats. The Blue Book says there was a Webley No. 1 1/2 Model that had a 4 1/4" octagon barrel and it says "limited examples of serial nos. 28,000 and 60,000 have been observed." Mine has a serial no. of 26632. The .442 cartridge was introduced in 1868. P. Webley & Son merged with W. & C. Scott in 1897 and formed Webley & Scott so I'm assuming it had to have been manufactured between 1868 and 1897. Webley produced R.I.C. Models 1, 2 and 3. I wonder if this variation was manufactured between the 1 and 2. I've seen pictures of the R.I.C. models and the grip on this one is shaped differently. The flat metal piece on the left rear of the frame is interesting. You can pull the hammer back about 1/4" and push this piece in and it holds the hammer away from the round in the chamber. When you cock it or pull the trigger it pops back out. I hope there's an expert here that may have a book with a picture of this one. The action is tight. I made up a dummy .442 round based on info in the Manual of Cartridge Conversions and it fits perfectly. I plan to load a few of them when I get the time and try it out.
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The cartouche shows W&S so it would be Webley and Son. The picture above that mark shows what appears to be a minie ball turned sideways. Hollow based and grooved on the outside. I can't make out the pic above that bullet...looks like sails or an Egyptian hat. Could this have been for British colony in say Morocco?
 

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I should have posted a better picture of that marking. It's stamped on both sides of the frame. It's a depiction of a bullet with wings. My gunmarks book says that a winged bullet was one of the symbols used by W&S.
 

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22lrfan said:
I should have posted a better picture of that marking. It's stamped on both sides of the frame. It's a depiction of a bullet with wings. My gunmarks book says that a winged bullet was one of the symbols used by W&S.
I believe you're correct. Garry James from Guns & Ammo did an article on that pistol as it related to one that Custer may have aledgidly been carrying at the Little Bighorn.
 
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