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This isn't a gunsmith question per se but i dont know where else to post this. I bought a hardware store single shot 16 gauge a while back for 55 bucks. It is mechanically sound and fires as it should but it looks like dog crap. I bought it as a fun project gun, nothing more. It is a Stevens 94 clone. The key difference I can tell is much cheaper wood in the stock and forend. The finish was also cheap, thin and obviously not very durable. As a result it is scratched to hell. I dont think I can sand it deep enough to get scratches out without affecting fit and finish of gun. As a result im considering either a very dark finish or just black paint to cover the scratches. I'm also concerned that the cheap wood will not accept stain well. But i dont think ive ever heard of anyone using paint on a wooden gunstocks. Anyone here have any first hand experience with it or suggestions?
 

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This isn't a gunsmith question per se but i dont know where else to post this. I bought a hardware store single shot 16 gauge a while back for 55 bucks. It is mechanically sound and fires as it should but it looks like dog crap. I bought it as a fun project gun, nothing more. It is a Stevens 94 clone. The key difference I can tell is much cheaper wood in the stock and forend. The finish was also cheap, thin and obviously not very durable. As a result it is scratched to hell. I dont think I can sand it deep enough to get scratches out without affecting fit and finish of gun. As a result im considering either a very dark finish or just black paint to cover the scratches. I'm also concerned that the cheap wood will not accept stain well. But i dont think ive ever heard of anyone using paint on a wooden gunstocks. Anyone here have any first hand experience with it or suggestions?
I have used black India ink on gunstocks. You get the look of old military stocks. Seal it with satin polyurethane. This picture is my ruger m77 mk2 walnut stock with India ink.
 

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MSGO Court Jester
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You could always check Numrich for a Stevens 94 stock.

Gun Parts & Firearm Accessories | Numrich Gun Parts

I have an old single shot .22 J.C. Higgins that is a Marlin clone. I had cut the stock down to start teaching my son to shoot when he was six, so I just bought a Marlin Stock for it from Numrich.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You could always check Numrich for a Stevens 94 stock.

Gun Parts & Firearm Accessories | Numrich Gun Parts

I have an old single shot .22 J.C. Higgins that is a Marlin clone. I had cut the stock down to start teaching my son to shoot when he was six, so I just bought a Marlin Stock for it from Numrich.
I thought about it. But this gun is valued at 100 bucks in mint condition. I've already got 60 bucks in it, so it wouldnt take much and I'd be upside down on it. I may go this route but only as a last resort if i totally foul up the stock I have
 

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MSGO Court Jester
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I thought about it. But this gun is valued at 100 bucks in mint condition. I've already got 60 bucks in it, so it wouldnt take much and I'd be upside down on it. I may go this route but only as a last resort if i totally foul up the stock I have
I was sorta in the same boat as far as value, but I only paid my cousin $15 for it when I was twelve. I'd love to get the barreled action refinished so that it looks as good as the stock. Might Cerakote it someday.
 

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Some popular and birch stocks have a good grain and stain well. I know what type finish, I think that you are talking about. I have refinished some and they appear to be some type of varnish stain that was sprayed on. One thing about it, a little stain goes a long way, if you want to sand most of the existing finish off and try it. If it does not please you, you can let it dry for several days, sand and clean, then put a black finish on it.
Regardless, you need to clean the stock with a clean cloth and your choice of rubbing alcohol, or mineral spirits to make sure that you may get any unseen hand oil off the wood before refinishing. Clean and dry several times. I mostly use 70-91% rubbing alcohol because it evaporates very quick if I want to refinish in several minutes.
 
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