Mississippi Gun Owners banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Tried them from Central Grocery to West Virginia and all states in between!

Hands down best is at Oby’s in Starkville.... was even better when Mrs Chris used to make the olive relish. Oddly she shared the recipe with the Oxford site but not the same.

Still worth the ride if you’re close.

ymmv!
B61BD42F-77F9-4B15-8C4F-21B1BF5453CC.jpeg
6B13F8B7-F781-4C5D-B83B-935C0D8229F6.jpeg
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,268 Posts
The muffulettes at Beer Barn in Greenville were great.
 

·
MSGO Court Jester
Joined
·
35,772 Posts
Only muffulettes I've had were from McAllister's and were very good.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LeansVeryRight2016

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,085 Posts
Best one I ever had was from the now closed(I think)
Progress grocery that was next door I seem to recall
from the Central Grocery that also makes a pretty good
one but Progress got its bread from Gambino's in NO
that made all the difference to me between good and
terrific.
 

·
Glad to be here
Joined
·
971 Posts
I'm a Central Grocery fan...gotta get the half with either a Dixie lager or Abita...real simple, but one of my favorites!
 

·
Be nice, or at least, be honest...and DOL
Joined
·
955 Posts
Believe it or not, Rouse's Grocery makes a darned good Muff. The biggest problem in making them outside of NO is getting the right bread. Muff bread is, well, Muff bread, made specifically for making them and nothing else is exactly the same.

And for anyone interested, here is a pretty old olive salad recipe from a reliable source in NO:

One measure of inexpensive green olives (I use a bottle of Mario's from Sam's Club - they come in a 2-jar package). You CAN use as expensive an olive as you feel necessary, but I doubt you, me or anyone else will be able to tell the difference between the Sam's bulk ones and another at 5-10 times the price.

One equal measure of inexpensive bottled giardiniera (or homemade - see below). Again, like the olives, spend as much as you want, but 99.99% won't be able to tell the difference between the most expensive and the cheapest.

About 1/2 measure ripe/black olives, either in oil (either jarred or bulk) or water (canned) - one is not "better" than the other, just different, and if using canned, buy whatever is cheapest because the priciest canned won't change the taste one bit. If you go with oiled, use what you like on its own. I (and the source of the recipe) recommend canned.

Here's the first trick to this version - don't discard the green olive brine or the giardiniera pickling liquid (if the black olives are canned, discard the water). Either hand chop everything or run through a food mill and return to the combined brines or pulse VERY CAREFULLY with at least some of the brines (but not the black olive liquid) in food processor - be careful, you want chopped, not pureed. A standard blender just won't work. Hand chopping is fine and pretty easy - you just need a rough chop, not perfect minced pieces. If you have capers or particularly like them, add them to the processor or rough chop them, but frankly, unless you are a big fan (or really seriously dislike them), you probably won't notice them one way or the other. IMO, if all you have available are the tiny little jars of them, I wouldn't bother, but if you have the large jars available, add them.

Put the chopped olives and giardiniera, along with the brines, back in the jars, mason jars, or a glass bowl - nothing metal - and let it sit for at least a day or three. NOW drain the brine completely and add whatever olive oil you know for a fact that you really like. The olive oil matters. What I mean by matters is that it doesn't have to be expensive, but it should be one that you like the taste of "naked," just on its own on a piece of bread, etc.

Here's the second trick - DO NOT put anything else, not even salt or pepper, in the salad. If you want to experiment, take a small portion and do it with that. It's hard to explain, but I suspect that between the brining/pickling, oil, etc., you really cannot season the ingredients themselves and so any additional ingredients just sort of sit on top of everything rather than become a part of them - think of adding thyme to a pot of red beans while cooking versus sprinkling it on a hot dog. You just aren't going to get the thyme into the hot dog itself.

The giardiniera: if you want to make your own and don't have a particular recipe: bell peppers in about 1" squares, celery slices, carrot slices, cauliflower chunks (stems and tops) pickled for at least a couple of weeks in the refrigerator. Use about 1/2 as much peppers as everything else. If you like it on the slightly spicier side, add a jar or two, brine and all, of stemmed and seeded peperoncini or sport peppers, but I wouldn't recommend things like jalapenos. Use plain old white vinegar and any basic pickling spices you like - garlic, mustard seeds, oregano, peppercorns, coriander seeds, bay, fennel seeds, etc. Heat the vinegar, add the spice, and pour over the vegetables. Pack into jars and keep in the refrigerator for a couple of weeks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Believe it or not, Rouse's Grocery makes a darned good Muff. The biggest problem in making them outside of NO is getting the right bread. Muff bread is, well, Muff bread, made specifically for making them and nothing else is exactly the same.

And for anyone interested, here is a pretty old olive salad recipe from a reliable source in NO:

One measure of inexpensive green olives (I use a bottle of Mario's from Sam's Club - they come in a 2-jar package). You CAN use as expensive an olive as you feel necessary, but I doubt you, me or anyone else will be able to tell the difference between the Sam's bulk ones and another at 5-10 times the price.

One equal measure of inexpensive bottled giardiniera (or homemade - see below). Again, like the olives, spend as much as you want, but 99.99% won't be able to tell the difference between the most expensive and the cheapest.

About 1/2 measure ripe/black olives, either in oil (either jarred or bulk) or water (canned) - one is not "better" than the other, just different, and if using canned, buy whatever is cheapest because the priciest canned won't change the taste one bit. If you go with oiled, use what you like on its own. I (and the source of the recipe) recommend canned.

Here's the first trick to this version - don't discard the green olive brine or the giardiniera pickling liquid (if the black olives are canned, discard the water). Either hand chop everything or run through a food mill and return to the combined brines or pulse VERY CAREFULLY with at least some of the brines (but not the black olive liquid) in food processor - be careful, you want chopped, not pureed. A standard blender just won't work. Hand chopping is fine and pretty easy - you just need a rough chop, not perfect minced pieces. If you have capers or particularly like them, add them to the processor or rough chop them, but frankly, unless you are a big fan (or really seriously dislike them), you probably won't notice them one way or the other. IMO, if all you have available are the tiny little jars of them, I wouldn't bother, but if you have the large jars available, add them.

Put the chopped olives and giardiniera, along with the brines, back in the jars, mason jars, or a glass bowl - nothing metal - and let it sit for at least a day or three. NOW drain the brine completely and add whatever olive oil you know for a fact that you really like. The olive oil matters. What I mean by matters is that it doesn't have to be expensive, but it should be one that you like the taste of "naked," just on its own on a piece of bread, etc.

Here's the second trick - DO NOT put anything else, not even salt or pepper, in the salad. If you want to experiment, take a small portion and do it with that. It's hard to explain, but I suspect that between the brining/pickling, oil, etc., you really cannot season the ingredients themselves and so any additional ingredients just sort of sit on top of everything rather than become a part of them - think of adding thyme to a pot of red beans while cooking versus sprinkling it on a hot dog. You just aren't going to get the thyme into the hot dog itself.

The giardiniera: if you want to make your own and don't have a particular recipe: bell peppers in about 1" squares, celery slices, carrot slices, cauliflower chunks (stems and tops) pickled for at least a couple of weeks in the refrigerator. Use about 1/2 as much peppers as everything else. If you like it on the slightly spicier side, add a jar or two, brine and all, of stemmed and seeded peperoncini or sport peppers, but I wouldn't recommend things like jalapenos. Use plain old white vinegar and any basic pickling spices you like - garlic, mustard seeds, oregano, peppercorns, coriander seeds, bay, fennel seeds, etc. Heat the vinegar, add the spice, and pour over the vegetables. Pack into jars and keep in the refrigerator for a couple of weeks.

PREACH ON!!!!

Got my mouth watering!!!!
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top