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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I don't do much wood refinishing, not as popular as it once was. But I am building me a 338 federal on a blue printed 700 action. I found me an older Fajen Stock that I would like to refinish. I don't want a high gloss finish. Something along the line of the picture below. Does anyone know what the stain color would be and what the top protective coating would be?

Thank you in advance for your thoughts,

I didn't do a good job explaining. My stock is no where close to these, I was wanting to redo my stock to look like the ones below


Herschell





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Looks good to me as it is too, I'd leave it alone were it
mine but since its not my advice is really meaningless.
 
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The stocks pictured are not the stock he wants to refinish if I read his post correctly...he wants to duplicate that finish. I would guess that the stock pictured is unstained walnut with several coats of a thinned polyurethane lightly sanded in between. I prefer a redder color, so I usually use a French-walnut stain. I'm partial to a hand-rubbed boiled linseed oil finish, but that is a lot of work and thinned polyurethane pretty much duplicates the look.
 

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Chief cook and bottle washer
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No pro at this but I use tung oil and its a beast if you don't cut it some. Takes forever to dry if you don't , but after you get it to stop soaking in and start building up coats. Use 2000-3000 grit sand paper and real fine steel wool in between coats for the first 5 or 6 (think its 000 or 0000 steel wool ) you can slowly make that semi gloss look. I also have to use tack cloth do get all the "fuzz" from the steel wool off before recoating. Sometimes I've put as much as 20-25 coats before it looked like I wanted. Use mineral spirits to "cut" it and you will have to try it several times before getting the right thickness like you want it.
 

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Stains tend to go down into the wood. So it will be hard to sand all that stain off. If you are wanting to get rid of the red tint, you will need a stain with a little green colorant added to a walnut-pecan stain. Do your stock prep and then take the stock down to an independent pain store that caters to painters. They are usually experienced in getting things just so for customers. I learned to add green to stain to kill some of the red tint 45 years ago by a painter that had painted for 50 years and was semi retired. I was in my early 20s. He had once made stain for a company that made cabinets. You might find a stain to do the job. You can test places like in the bed of the stock.
 
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Chief cook and bottle washer
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Stains tend to go down into the wood. So it will be hard to sand all that stain off. If you are wanting to get rid of the red tint, you will need a stain with a little green colorant added to a walnut-pecan stain. Do your stock prep and then take the stock down to an independent pain store that caters to painters. They are usually experienced in getting things just so for customers. I learned to add green to stain to kill some of the red tint 45 years ago by a painter that had painted for 50 years and was semi retired. I was in my early 20s. He had once made stain for a company that made cabinets. You might find a stain to do the job. You can test places like in the bed of the stock.
That is great info sir thanks !
 

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Green+Red = Brown glad to help.
 
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