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Discussion Starter #1
I've inherited a nice older model Remington 1100 that's right now is fitted with a 12 gauge barrel. When I inherited it the person gave me 3 barrels one of em is a 20 gauge barrel and another is a 16. You can't simply change the gauge of a shotgun by changing its barrel can you? Would a different gauge barrel even fit properly? I'd hate to mistake it for a 12 gauge and have the receiver portion of it actually be for 16 or 20.
 

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Having to go back and rely on my failing memory...I never tried to interchange different gauge barrels on an 1100, but I think the 20 gauge receiver is smaller than the 12 gauge. In addition, if the 16 gauge barrel does fit on the 12 gauge receiver it would have to be used as a single shot because the magazine is designed for the larger diameter round. The extractors and ejector could be problematical also. Best advice: sell the extra barrels and get barrels designed for your receiver or a different gun in a smaller gauge.
 

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Grouchy Old Fart
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Do not try to use it with the other barrels! The bolt face is designed for one gauge only and the magazine also! You can ruin a nice gun and injure yourself if you try it!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I didn't plan on trying to swap the barrels, my concerns are if it had already been done and may be a smaller caliber/gauge receiver. They are no definitive markings on the receiver to indicate which one it is. Should I bring it to a local gunsmith for an inspection before I use it?
 

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I wouldn't think that would be necessary. If the barrel mates to the receiver and the bolt locks into the barrel ...... I'd stuff a handful of 12 ga shells in it and let er rip.
 

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Waffennarr
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Having to go back and rely on my failing memory...I never tried to interchange different gauge barrels on an 1100, but I think the 20 gauge receiver is smaller than the 12 gauge. In addition, if the 16 gauge barrel does fit on the 12 gauge receiver it would have to be used as a single shot because the magazine is designed for the larger diameter round. The extractors and ejector could be problematical also. Best advice: sell the extra barrels and get barrels designed for your receiver or a different gun in a smaller gauge.
Shotguns generally have the gauge marked only on the barrel. If you cannot definitively determine the gauge of your receiver / bolt assembly then take it to a competent gunsmith! Not worth damaging the firearm nor injuring yourself!
 
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Here ya go. Compare the last letter of your serial number on the receiver to this chart.

V = 12ga. standard 2" frame/receiver
M = 12ga. magnum 3" frame/receiver
W= 16ga. 2" frame/receiver
X = 20 ga. 2" frame/receiver
N = 20 ga. magnum 3" frame/receiver
K = 20 ga. lightweight 2" frame/receiver (LW)
K = 20 ga. lightweight 2" frame/receiver (LT)
U = 20 ga. lightweight magnum 3" frame/receiver
J = 28ga. 2" frame/receiver
H = .410 3" frame/receiver

If you don't have a letter at the end of your serial # call Remington Customer service and give them the serial # on your receiver. Or call Remington anyway they can give you all the info from your Receiver Serial #. Most people use the barrel ID # to date their guns.

1100's are excellent guns buy you some extra O-rings for the gas system and that's about all they need besides cleaning.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Just to update, I verified by the serial number that it is a 12 gauge. Time to clean it up now and shoot some targets and skeets!
 

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Lightly lube magazine tube first.
Initially, load no more than 2 rounds, in case fire control has been altered or is defective.
Better safe than sorry.
 
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