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Hello:

Just purchased a new forearm for a project Remington 1100. Afterwards, noticed that the stock was redone at some point and is not the same color as forearm. I believe the forearm is original.

The stock is in need of refurbishing. What color wood stain did Remington use back in the 1970s? Some times, wood stains also have a number associated with them. Can anyone assist?

Thanks,

Geo
 

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Once you get all the finish off the stock, you can experiment until you find the right color match...I'd get an old piece of walnut (from a broken stock, etc., take all the finish off, and use it as a wooden color swatch. Good luck at duplicating the Remington factory finish on either piece...if you have them both stripped, stain them to match and put on your own favorite final finish.
 

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Hello:

Just purchased a new forearm for a project Remington 1100. Afterwards, noticed that the stock was redone at some point and is not the same color as forearm. I believe the forearm is original.

The stock is in need of refurbishing. What color wood stain did Remington use back in the 1970s? Some times, wood stains also have a number associated with them. Can anyone assist?

Geo
My73 model is in the back of the safe, and besides, I could not make pic that really looked like what it actually is.
This internet pic, is very close,
 

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Try stripping your stock to bare naked wood. Apply "spirit" stain, using Honey Gold Brown and Winchester Red and a third I can't remember, available from Brownell's. Caution!!!! Contains xylene and will put you on the floor if you don't have ventilation. After you match color, reapply clear lacquer, poly varnish etc. of choice.
dhollis said it best. Trying to match colors is futile. One has aged, starting to get patina, the other not.
Good luck!
 

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I usually will intermix just a little bit of red stain added to , golden oak. You can get that redish look by inter mixing stain. Lucky for you, you can go to a quality paint store, like Benjamin Moore etc; take your stock in and you can now buy 1/2 pint cans of stain. I/2 PINT OR 2 CANs mixed in a pail that is clean or coffee can will stain several stocks. Go by a cabinet shop and they will probably give you some small pieces of wood that they ran through the saw and small strips and pieces end up in the trash pile. Also when you put just a clear sealer, varnish, etc on bare wood the color will change and usually darken up. Your stock looks similar to a early American stain that has been cut with paint thinner. I painted for 30 years, been doing stocks for 15 or so years.
Take your time. Ask for a professional, older cabinet maker/finisher, or Gunsmith that also finishes stocks, private owned paint store paint mixer. Good luck.
 
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