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My dad has a old nylon 66 he got when he was a kid and my uncle broke the stock on it. Bet that caused a good fist fight. Anyway does anyone know where I can find a replacement stock for it on the net or around jackson preferably in black?
 

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There's black one on gunbroker.com right now, bid is $165.11 :shock: Numrich gun parts doesn't have any.



I never knew the receiver of a nylon 66 was part of the stock too.
 

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#$%^& only the end of it is broken. Been shooting it all my life that way for that price wont hurt to shoot it a little longer with a broken stock. Shame that gun probally didn't cost that much new. :scratch:
 

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bubbat said:
I never knew the receiver of a nylon 66 was part of the stock too.
Family had one in the 1960s.

The metal that looks like the receiver is just a tin cover. The workings are all plastic and part of the stock as I recall.

It never failed to fire, but the barrel would flex where it joined the receiver, and a scope mounted on the receiver made for a very inaccurate rifle.

Some owners swore by them, but I hated the inaccuracy of ours.

I think the record for shooting 1inch blocks tossed in he air is still held by some guy shooting a Nylon 66. His must have been better than ours.
 
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The stock/reveiver is the serialized part and you are essentially buying another gun. You may want to try repairing or patching the stock you have or shoot it as is.
 

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I have a friend who's uncle did some prototype testing on the Nylon 66 for Remington. His uncle said he abused the test rifle.

Buried it on the beach for week, left it underwater for while, froze it, heated it. Just gave it hell. Even after all that it never jammed or failed to fire. When he got through he turned in his reports to Remington and they thanked him and said you can have the rifle as payment. He said if he had known they were gonna do that he would not have abused the rifle so much. Somebody in my friends family still has the rifle.
 

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Shooter said:
The stock/reveiver is the serialized part and you are essentially buying another gun. You may want to try repairing or patching the stock you have or shoot it as is.
No sir. The receiver/serial numbered part is the sheet metal top cover. Look on the left side of the cover (opposite side from the ejection port) for the serial number.

The stock can be purchased/sold just like any other stock.

If the stock is split or cracked, as opposed to missing a piece, it may be repairable. Dupont continues to manufacture Zytel nylon resin for many purposes, including automotive body parts. I would email them to inquire as to the proper resin/epoxy to use. It may be something available at your auto supply store.

http://www2.dupont.com/Plastics/en_US/Products/Zytel/Zytel.html

Stryker60
 

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ruger10 said:
My dad has a old nylon 66 he got when he was a kid and my uncle broke the stock on it. Bet that caused a good fist fight. Anyway does anyone know where I can find a replacement stock for it on the net or around jackson preferably in black?
Yall still got that thing I see. Seems like we took many a squirell with that thing.
 
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Stryker 60 is right. I took mine apart last night to double check. I should have done that before I posted. The stock is the functioning part of the receiver. I was thinking both parts were serialized. They aren't.
 

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Here is an interesting article on the Nylon 66:

LINK

Note that later models were made in Brazil and see where it says:
It should be noted that these 1967-68 serial numbers were located on the bottom of the barrel about 3" back from the muzzle.

In December 1968, the serial numbers were moved to the receiver cover. At the same time, the numbering was re-started at 2100000 and went to 2599999 in January 1977.

In February 1977, an "A" was added and the range was restarted at A2100000. These serial number series were for all Nylon rifles, not just Nylon 66s.

The auto-loading .22 caliber Remington Nylon 66 rifle was introduced by Remington Arms in 1959, featuring a synthetic stock built from the DuPont material Zytel, a compound similar to Nylon. The largely synthetic construction meant that the Nylon 66 could operate without any added lubricants. This made it very popular in arctic regions, and indeed there have been many reports of indigenous peoples taking large animals, such as moose, with a .22LR fired from a Nylon 66. Some have speculated that the light weight of the gun could potentially cause substandard accuracy in the field, but this does not seem to be a complaint from Nylon 66 shooters.

The Nylon 66 was fitted with leaf sights as well as a grooved receiver that could accommodate a mount for a telescopic sight. It was available in several colors, such as "Mohawk Brown", "Apache Black," and "Seneca Green". The "Seneca Green" version is the rarest, as it was discontinued in 1963.

The Apache version of the Remington Model 66 has a rather bright green stock and was sold by K-Mart. The Seneca Green is a rather dull colored green and, in some lighting conditions, Seneca Green is difficult to distinguish from the more common brown.

Brazilian production of Nylon 66 rifle

The Nylon 66 was also made under license in Brazil by CBC - Companhia Brasileira de Cartuchos (Brazilian Cartridge Company, aka Magtech outside Brazil) from 1962 to 1992 in three finish grades: standard (brown stock), deluxe (black stock with engraved blued receiver), and super deluxe (black stock with nickel plated barrel and receiver). CBC produced 201,210 Nylon 66 rifles.

The Zytel was replaced by a cheaper material, called Technyl, in the later Nylon 66 produced in Brazil.
Did you know they made bolt action and lever action rifles?

Here is a better history of the gun:

LINK
 

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Shooter said:
I've seen the lever version but not the bolt. Man, something else to look for.
I believe the bolt version was called the Nylon 11. It came in both a clip and tube fed versions. I briefly owned the clip (I know "magazine" is the correct term, but the tube is also a magazine, so....) version, but let a friend talk me out of it.

Stryker60

P.S. I'm not trying to pick on you Shooter. If it seems that way, please accept my apology. Things can be easily misinterpreted on the internet.
 
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If I would have thought that you would have got a PM. I don't air personal stuff in public. If you don't hear from me personally then we don't have a problem.
 

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Nylon 66

My first gun, bought for me when I was 7, was a Bolt Action Mossberg 12 Gauge. It was too big, too bulky and too powerful for me to handle so my father bought me a Nylon 66. We bought it for 39 dollars from Pep Boys back in 1970. Back when Pep Boys was selling guns as well as auto parts and bicycles. I absolutely loved that gun. Cant remember what happened to it. But if I were to find one at a decent price today, Id jump right on it.
 
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