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I've grown tired of pitching brass because it has a military primer.

Anyone have any tips they'd like to share for swaging primer pockets....Have given the following some thought...

Looks like it might be a little difficult to set up...not sure...RCBS Primer pocket Swager Combo...Not sure it will work in my Lee Progressive

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=447022
 

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Rbelote said:
Get a dillon 600 swager.
I have a dillon 600 and do recommend it - it will do a lot of cases in a short time; however, it is pricey $90-$100 and not really worth the money if you only use it for a small amount of brass .... I used it on about 10,000 .223 cases and it worked great.

Agree with HAMMER - a deburring tool (I like the Lyman one over the RCBS) and a couple quick turns in the primer pocket and the crimp is gone .. When selecting the reburring tool, make sure it will fit into your primer pocket ... I have one for .45acp and another for .223 and 9mm.
 

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Guys, maybe it's me, or semantics, but definitely not Southern Drawl, but "swage" means to move metal, that is, to CRIMP the primer in it's pocket.

A "swager", then, does not REMOVE the crimp.

Removing the military crimped-in primer should be no real problem, just takes a little more "oomph" to get the spent primer out. Cleaning away the remains of the military crimp is the problem; if you don't, the fresh, new primer will likely not enter the pocket, or will cock and become damaged.

Sometimes, it's no trouble at all. I have a bunch of 9mm brass with crimped primer pockets, marked 'ISC" I believe, and the new primers enter pretty easy without removing the crimp.
 
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I'm in the process of depriming 4,000 once-fired 5.56 brass. I cannot tell much difference in depriming the military and civilian brass. I deprime and resize in the same operation. Haven't broken a decapping pin yet. As far as removing the crimp goes, I purchased an RCBS hand held crimp remover. I took a piece of a regular cleaning rod and cut about 1" of the female end off, unscrewed the de-crimping bit from the handle and screwed it into the 1" cleaning rod piece. I then put this in a varable speed drill and , running it at a slow speed, de-crimp my brass. It works great and you don't have sore, tired hands when you're finished. I spend more time trimming the brass to size than anything else.
 

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I use a Lee universal decapping die and an RCBS primer pocket swage kit. It doesn't cut or remove any metal from the pocket. It forces or swages the crimp from the primer pocket so that the brass can be primed like commercial brass. This is more reliable then the Lyman primer pocket reamers which can remove too much brass resulting in loose primers.
 

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AKMan51 said:
I use a Lee universal decapping die and an RCBS primer pocket swage kit. It doesn't cut or remove any metal from the pocket. It forces or swages the crimp from the primer pocket so that the brass can be primed like commercial brass. This is more reliable then the Lyman primer pocket reamers which can remove too much brass resulting in loose primers.
Now here is something sounding good. Never heard of a tool which swages the crimp out, but it sure makes sense. What drives the swage tool to expand away the crimp? Do you hit it, push it in the loading press, or what?
 

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What drives the swage tool to expand away the crimp? Do you hit it, push it in the loading press, or what?
http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=447022
It consists of a standard size 7/8 x 14 die with a stem that runs the length of the die and a punch that fits in the shell holder slot of the press. You run the brass into the die up to the adjustable stem, then press the swage punch up into the primer pocket. This swages the crimp out of the primer pocket.

It's kinda slow but you only have to do it once and the crimp is gone for good.
 

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*******, I use the swager unit you posted about. I have it set up in a separate older single stage press that is dedicated to swaging. I've done thousands of .223 and .308 with it. Its relatively easy once its set correctly. This unit is the same die thread as all other std dies so it should fit. I have bent the rod a few time in it though due to finicky cases of different makes. Just pounded it back out flat with a hammer. I don't have a progressive press so I'm not sure if it would work in one.

But, no, don't throw out brass due to mil crimps. Keep it all! And even in a desperate situation even berdan primed cases can be reloaded with some extra work.
 
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