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I teach personal protection classes and I recommend that if the shooter is not well versed in maintenance and gun handling, they should buy a revolver in lieu of the semi-auto. A failure to fire or eject a spent round in a semi-auto requires the slide to be cycled again and the pistol tipped to the side to allow the cartridge or casing to fall free from the pistol. A stovepipe jam requires the shooter to sweep the top of the pistol with his hand and knock the vertical case off the slide. The worst case scenario is a fired case slipping the extractor and the loaded round loading on top of the fired case. This usually requires a cleaning rod to remove the fired case. Also semi-auto pistols have to be lubricated to function properly. WE had 4 guys that brought 1911 Colt pistols to our last class. All 4 were very dry and they shot them with a limp wrist. All 4 pistols malfunctioned until I lubricated them.

There was a lady at our class yesterday that had a Taurus 9mm with plastic frame colored pink. It was so light it nearly kicked out of her hand. A pistol has to have a reasonable weight to prevent heavy recoil.

The revolver on the other hand requires a lot less maintenance and lubrication. In all of the above malfunction scenarios, just pull the trigger to fiore the revolver. There are some cases where the revolver may give trouble. A squib load can drive a bullet halfway into the barrel and lock up the cylinder. Careful reloading or the use of factory ammo in a self defense revolver can eliminate this problem.

As I said a new shooter needs a revolver.

Another plus with the revolver, you don't have to bend over and pick up empties.

Doug
 

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Another plus with the revolver, you don't have to bend over and pick up empties.

Doug[/quote] :lol4:

Excellent advice Doug. I think anyone who has never fired a handgun should at least try a revolver first.
 

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Doug, good advice. Still thinking about a smaller one for myself as a car carry gun (smaller than the Ruger 44mag)...if the SHTF, the revolver is fail proof even with only one hand....either....

I like the Charter arms in 38S.... but still seem to lean towards a 357....like the Rugers, Taurus, and S&W's (S&W's are high$$ though)....

:gun2:
 

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I like the revolvers too.. But am learning to like the autos.
 
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they both CAN be great.
or they can be false security.

it depends on the shooter.
 

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Over the past few weeks, I have found a new appreciation for the revolvers. Decided to take one out a couple weeks ago and blast some 38s I had loaded up that were getting stale ... had a ball!! Shoot all I had in stock and have started loading more .... Really need to learn to shoot 'em a little better!!
 

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Very good advice. Most revolver have a hard tigger pull, one can learn tigger control on a revolver and then move on to something else. Mr. Cargill proved this to me in his class.
 

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Good Advice! I couldn't agree more! Most folks won't put in the time to really become proficient with a semi-auto, and learn how to clear malfunctions should they occur. They would be better served with a revolver. Kind a like a computer mouse "Point and Click".
 

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I lean toward the revolver myself. Though I must confess as an ex-LEO, my glock 22 never once let me down. But my CCW is the Tarus 85 ultalite in 38 spc +p. Shoots like a dream.. My kinda dream anyway.. :thumbup:
 

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My wife and daughter (new shooters) defnately prefer the S&W 686 over the Glock 17.

Matters not to me which they like as long as they like and shoot with something...

It is pretty hard to beat an old S&W revolver with a sweet trigger
 

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pmeisel said:
I like pistols. I love my revolvers.
+1 --- I have recently found a new appreciation for my revolvers.
 

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I am an auto guy. I have shot and owned revolvers and respect them, but I much prefer autos. From grip angle to numerous other advantages in my opinion, I'd take an auto for just about any handgun application (extremely large caliber hunting would definitely be an exception). That being said, I agree with nearly everything Mr. Bowser posted to start this thread, as autos do in general require a little more familiarization and practice to become proficient with their operation.

Doug Bowser said:
if the shooter is not well versed in maintenance and gun handling, they should buy a revolver in lieu of the semi-auto.
I agree, although ideally the shooter will become well versed in maintenance and gun handling of whatever they choose. If they are not going to put the time and effort in, the revolver is the better choice.

Doug Bowser said:
Careful reloading or the use of factory ammo in a self defense revolver can eliminate this problem.
"Eliminate" is such a strong word. I've personally witnessed numerous factory screw ups. Let's see, a Federal factory squib, a Remington round loaded with the bullet upside down in the case (not kidding, .45 ACP with the base of the bullet up. Of course this was easily noticed before it was ever loaded in a magazine/cylinder), and I even witnessed a Glock "kaboom" on a factory Winchester White Box round. Barrel was split, frame bulged, plastic trigger face missing, shooters hand cut, etc. I figure double charge, but there had apparently been a jam immediately before it so there is a possibility that the prior round was a squib that got stuck in the barrel. Shooter said he didn't hear a squib, but it was an indoor range and there were others shooting so the other noise could have covered it up.

Doug Bowser said:
As I said a new shooter needs a revolver.
I personally would just finish this sentence with "or some more training/practice with the auto." I don't think a new shooter should be intimidated by an auto. It just needs to be accepted that there is a responsibility of learning its "manual of arms", so to speak, as a part of owning it.

My $.02 anyway, from an avowed "bottom feeder" fan.
 
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