Mississippi Gun Owners banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
μολὼν λαβέ
Joined
·
38,417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have a m13 or 65 .357 that can measure the cylinder length? I'm curious to whether the m10 38 cylinder is the same length as the m13/65 357 cylinders.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cliff731

·
Registered
Joined
·
529 Posts
So, I poked my head into the S&W Forums to see if anybody had asked this question and they had. This was the best reply I saw to your question.

"I have a couple of 357 made out of model 10s. In fact just recently made a 10-7 into a fake model 13 pinto. The 357 cylinders are a bit longer than 38 special cylinders and that means the model 10 barrel shanks are a bit longer. It is really easier to go with a 357 barrel and a 357 cylinder. I have not found any difference in the yokes at all, except for the short period when they put the gas ring on the yoke. If you change barrels you may have to make adjustments to the barrel shoulder to get the sights to time right and the cylinder needs to be fit to the frame barrel and yoke. There is also some variations on the front of the frame where it meets the barrel Some dash numbers are real rounded on top and some have a more broadened area. This effects the match up.
Fake model 13, If you look close you can se a tiny bit of mismatch where outside edges of the model 13 wide rib doesn't match up with the 10-7 frame."
 

·
Danged ole' Hermit...
Joined
·
13,941 Posts
Time for a phone call to S&W customer service for 'tech support'...???
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,483 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: Cliff731

·
μολὼν λαβέ
Joined
·
38,417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
  • Like
Reactions: Twang

·
MSGO Court Jester
Joined
·
41,553 Posts
My question is, why would you even want to try it? Why risk blowing up a model 10, or at the very least, ruin a model 10 cylinder? Why not just buy a used .357?
 

·
μολὼν λαβέ
Joined
·
38,417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My question is, why would you even want to try it? Why risk blowing up a model 10, or at the very least, ruin a model 10 cylinder? Why not just buy a used .357?
Why would anyone want to do anything? And why would you think it would blow it up, because SAMMI lists the 38 at 17500 and +P at 18500? In the beginning the 38 was regularly loaded to 20k right? Also the 357 came about from reaming the cylinders on a 10-6 ? I don't ever remember reading that one of those ever blew up. So my thinking is there is no heat treatment difference in the 10/64's and the 13/65's. Only difference is length of forcing cone to accommodate a slight increase in cylinder length. And that probably came about to keep people from making the conversion.

Here's another thing to consider. Many revolvers S&W and Ruger hell even Taurus was converted to fire 9mm. What is the pressure limit on 9mm? On 357mag? I'll tell you, both are 35k. So if this was a dangerous undertaking why would gunsmiths offer this conversion? I was even told by one they would ream to 38 super which is 36500 or I believe the same as NATO 9mm. Thinking about it I remember one having a 9x23 conversion done with no ill effects.

See I'm not a purist with my firearms. If I think a mod may improve it or better suit what I want I'll go for it. Sometimes I like it sometimes I don't. I chopped a m10 barrel to 3", don't care for it and I'm more than likely going to have a SS 4" hvy barrel installed. Hell I may even have a rib sight installed on it like the PPC ribs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
As was stated above, comparing the two, the 13 is definitely longer than the 10, and the frames are the same size. Model 13 forcing cone is shorter than the 10.
 

·
Danged ole' Hermit...
Joined
·
13,941 Posts
My question is, why would you even want to try it? Why risk blowing up a model 10, or at the very least, ruin a model 10 cylinder? Why not just buy a used .357?
................. (y) (y) (y) (y) (y)

Jim Supica & Richard Nahas noted in their "3rd Generation" book Standard Catalog of Smith & Wesson that a noted difference between early and later J-frame revolvers was lengthening the frame and cylinder opening for a "longer" cylinder to accommodate .357 Magnum caliber rounds on specific variants therein... which was done near or about the "dash-1" J-frame 640, 642. 442. etc. Evidently, all of 'em were re-designed in this manner.

(My S&W 642-1 and 442-1 have slightly longer frame & cylinder than my son's earlier manufactured S&W Model 640 .38 Special.)
 

·
Premium Member
Let's go shoot some, we dont want to wound anything.
Joined
·
6,491 Posts
I have a Model 65 stainless in excellent condition Rig. That I might consider selling or trading for something that tickles my fancy so to speak. I would be afraid of the frame not being able to handle the increased pressures of a 357 mag ammo. If I did do something like you are thinking about doing, I would stamp on the cylinder 38 ammo or 38 plus P for anyone that might get the revolver after I am gone.
I would sell the 10 and get a revolver designed for 357 ammo or keep it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cliff731 and rigrat
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top