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Its a trigger shoe. There are two small screws on the side, loosen those and it will come off easily. It's for guys and girls that like a wide trigger. Bullseye shooters use/used them a lot. They get a bad rap if you carry the gun in a holster, snagging the side of the holster and firing a round down your leg. You wouldnt want it to come loose during a gunfight either, as it will bind the trigger, making the gun a paperweight or a rock.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ok thanks Bert! I am supposed to go look at this revolver for a potential trade and did not know if that trigger shoe would affect the value.
 

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Have not seen one of those in a loooooong time.
 
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On that long-barreled gun the shoe would not be inappropriate; it is mostly a target gun and would not often be carried in a holster by most people. I've never had any trouble with a shoe on a holster revolver and have used one a lot of times...you would have to shove it VERY hard to get the full double-action pull on the trigger. But they make these shoes to fit 1911's also, and while I like the feel of one when installed on a short to medium length trigger, I don't trust them since I carry a 1911 cocked and locked and the lock could be accidently left off...a wide trigger shoe could well set off such a rig.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I traded for the revolver in the photo today. It is a model 35-1 and there isn’t a lot of info regarding this gun on the internet. I will make a new post requesting info. Thanks guys!
 

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The Model 35 was the evolution of the Model of 1953 22/32 Target. In plain English, that was a .22 caliber gun built on a .32 caliber I or J frame. As noted above, yours is a J frame, which means it's essentially the .22 caliber brother of guns like the Model 60.

The trigger shoe was a common add-on back in the day. The only real note of caution is that the two allen screws holding it may have left marks on the side of the trigger. It's not the end of the world (especially if you intend to shoot the gun), but a discerning collector will note that.

If you share the serial number (feel free to XX out the last few digits), I can try to estimate the year that it shipped from the factory for you.

Mike
 

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This is my pre-model 34 kit gun. I don't know the year model, just that it's earlier than 1957. It's an "I" frame. I had to slightly modify the insides of these Pachmayr grips to make them fit. I never had the original grips . . . it had some goofy looking plastic "Imitation Stag" grips when I got it. I did keep them, though.
IMG_20190720_100755349.jpg
 

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This is my pre-model 34 kit gun. I don't know the year model, just that it's earlier than 1957. It's an "I" frame. I had to slightly modify the insides of these Pachmayr grips to make them fit. I never had the original grips . . . it had some goofy looking plastic "Imitation Stag" grips when I got it. I did keep them, though.
View attachment 207313
The plastic stag grips were a popular distributor add-on. It's likely that the gun left the factory with proper wood stocks, but the wholesaler "upgraded" the gun to get a few more pennies for it from the dealer. The Pachmayr's look great on it and I bet it's a real joy to shoot.

mike
 
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