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Let's go shoot some, we dont want to wound anything.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are you going to work on all guns or just the ones that interest you?
If you are going to work on guns for the common man or woman, then you will need a good working knowledge of the almost indestructible 22 semi auto rifle. Almost everybody owns at least one. Some folks like me and probably you own several. And once folks start hearing that you can repair a gun, they will bring them. Some are fairly easy to work on while others have their own quirks and problems that will find you. I have took down so many Marlin Model 60s that I think that I could do it blindfolded. Most all of them are dirty inside due to the years of carbon and powder residue and the way that they are designed. I have determined that many of the designs are made to shoot dirty up to a certain point. On the inside of the receiver you will notice several off set or recessed places and this is usually where most of the crud will build up. Then where the bolt slides and meets the receiver, it usually remains clean.
I was taught at a early age to clean my guns after hunting, which for years was a shotgun.
Then back in the 70s my Dad who liked 22 rifles loaned me one he had, a Winchester 190 22 semi auto. That little rifle was very accurate for my 20 year old eyes. I refinished that gun, I remember because I am working on one now. It is funny how life goes in circles.
7 years ago I built one of these rifles out of one that somebody had thrown away on the side of the road and a friend,s Wife had found it. Then there are the pesky Remington 550-1 semi autos. I have the second one of these in a year. And Mossberg made their share of these 22 autos. And the Ruger 10/22 , they run like the Energizer battery. So put in your time, these guns are easy to find and eventually someone will want you to work on these hard working, hard playing 22 semi-auto rifles.
 

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When I started collecting/accumulating may years ago I started with .22's since that's all I could afford. I searched all the pawn shops for old ones. I always asked if they had any that were broken or had problems. Many time they had ones in the back they couldn't sell because they wouldn't shoot. The didn't want to pay a gunsmith to inspect/fix them. I bought lots of semi-auto that the only thing wrong was they were dirty enough that they wouldn't cycle. I picked up a bunch of Marlin 60's for $20-$30 that only needed a good cleaning.
 

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Let's go shoot some, we dont want to wound anything.
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6,330 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I worked on so many of the Marlins that when I needed a recoil spring I would order several. On the Winchester 190 that I cleaned inside the receiver tonight, the barrel nut had backed out and was not even hand tight. I am enjoying them now because I usually know what the problem is.
 

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I could only pick one, extra money, or guns.
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I myself found myself in possession of a marlin model 60 from my brother who eloquently described it as a piece of s&>t, it as well was just really dirty.
 

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It was always really interesting/exciting/terrifying to tear into one you've never seen the insides of before.....especially when parts would fallout on the bench and you have no idea where they came from or where they go. It was like putting together a jigsaw puzzle with no picture to go by. I finally found an old copy of the Numerich catalog that was full of exploded views. I read that thing from front to back.
 

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I could only pick one, extra money, or guns.
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4,437 Posts
It was always really interesting/exciting/terrifying to tear into one you've never seen the insides of before.....especially when parts would fallout on the bench and you have no idea where they came from or where they go. It was like putting together a jigsaw puzzle with no picture to go by. I finally found an old copy of the Numerich catalog that was full of exploded views. I read that thing from front to back.
That's really what got me into guns.
What you just described.
 

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Let's go shoot some, we dont want to wound anything.
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Nylon 66 not yet. I know what it is like to have springs with a pin on top take off into the air. I actually saw a sear post on a cheap 380 take off and I saw it as it cleared a rifle barrel.With old arthritis being angry at me first of this week I have not got down on my knees with flashlight .I looked for a hour or two. I had to make an order so I just ordered another post. It is not so much seeing where flying things go down, but where they bounce to. Thanks to ya,ll posting about the Nylon 66,the one I had, I did not need to go inside. It looked like it had hardly been shot. I just had to remove a broken cocking handle and install a new one. One of these days when I make more room, I may get a small lathe for making parts..
I have ignorantly made fun of semi-autos back in the 80s - 90s after I had graduated to lever actions and bolt actions. Now I have a new found respect for the semi autos. They were and still are very tough. Some are surprising in the accuracy department. And along came Ruger and aftermarket goodies. Now nobody is very surprised as to the accuracy
 

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Oh, one trick I've learned (took me WAY too long to learn it) is to disassemble guns inside a cardboard box when possible...it will save you a lot of time on your hands and knees with a flashlight!
 

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I'm not a home gunsmith - but I do "tinker" occasionally. One thing that REALLY helped me - go to Harbor Freight and get yourself at least one magnetic tray. I think they only cost about $5 or so. It is about the size of a large ash tray and has a metal bowl with a magnet at the bottom. That holds all the screws and springs you take out. It's much easier to keep from loosing screws and springs if they are held in that magnetic tray.
 

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Custodial Engineer at Third Monkey Outfitters
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Oh, one trick I've learned (took me WAY too long to learn it) is to disassemble guns inside a cardboard box when possible...it will save you a lot of time on your hands and knees with a flashlight!
I take it a step further on some disassembly. For instance, when I have, say, a trigger group or something similar that I know parts are under tension/pressure.... I'll have large Ziploc bags that I will put it in and begin the work. If something 'lets loose' it is either trapped in that bag or hits me in the stomach coming out. Has saved me many hours over 30 years of looking for little parts that 'flew out'. :)

Sometimes I STILL forget or get lax and BOOM.... there I am looking around on the floor again.
:)
 

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I'm not a home gunsmith - but I do "tinker" occasionally. One thing that REALLY helped me - go to Harbor Freight and get yourself at least one magnetic tray. I think they only cost about $5 or so. It is about the size of a large ash tray and has a metal bowl with a magnet at the bottom. That holds all the screws and springs you take out. It's much easier to keep from loosing screws and springs if they are held in that magnetic tray.
I got one much like that one from Ruger at the ShopRuger website, it has saved me a lot of effort in
searching for errant small parts and the huge Ziploc
bag idea is also great at preventing flying fickle fingers
of fate...….thank you Laugh In!!!:lol5:
 

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I have used the cardboard box trick - I have not used the Ziploc bag but sounds like a good deal --
I have used a shop cloth wrapped around the area many, many times to contain the flying parts --
Of course I keep a very strong light and a good magnet on hand too...…

And - for my guns I take down very frequently for maintenance and cleaning (like my trap shotgun) - I keep spares of the little springs and parts most likely to fly away -
 

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I had some trouble using pin punches inside of Ziplock bags; otherwise it is a good idea and works well (like when lifting the action cover off of a Nylon 66.) I've had a couple of magnetic trays sitting around for years...they will stick to the side of your big metal roll-around tool box when not in use. ;)
 

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I could only pick one, extra money, or guns.
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The sheer terror of hearing an errant small part or spring bounce across the floor into the unkown is a sound I'm all too familiar with.

I've tried both the box and ziploc bag techniques but parts still get away from me from time to time.
 

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One more thing you need (and I need to replace mine since it disappeared in my last move). Get yourself one of those big magnets on a broomstick - the kind woodworkers use for picking screws up off the floor. Comes in handy for trying to actually find that one spring or screw that dropped on the floor.
 

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Let's go shoot some, we dont want to wound anything.
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I have used the zip-loc bags, especially if I have to order some parts and it will be a week or so till I get back to the gun. The gallon zip loc bags work great on pistols, I just put everything in the bag and get on another project. Another thing I use are the Tupperware containers, the plastic sealable boxes that thin sliced sandwich meat now come in.
Night before last I got a box that a clock came in, took a little tape and plugged a couple holes and put a pistol frame and parts in till I get back on it next week. The old song by Hank JR. a Country Boy Can Survive comes to mind; as to there is not one solution but whatever you can improvise to make things easier.
My only problem with the zip-loc bags is that I keep running out of them.
 
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