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Discussion Starter #1
I don't know why I didn't ask any of you guys about this sooner...

My grandfather brought this back from his campaign in the pacific during WWII. I inherited it after his passing in the 90's. At some point, it was dry fired and the firing pin snapped. I need a replacement. A few years ago, a piece of the stock broke off. I still have the piece, but have decided it better to not re-attach it with wood glue.

Any of you know of people dealing parts for these rifles?

I used to know a guy, I believe his name is Louis Cranford, who ran a website called JapaneseRifleParts.com. It's been offline for some years now.

The rifle needs a new pin, a new stock, and a screw that was destroyed before my time, that I had to remove with a bit.

I realize it would be more cost efficient to just buy another rifle as these are cheaper than nagants.... but this was my grandfather's trophy and I've been interested in restoring it, and refinishing it for years.

Just kind of curious if you guys know anything, or of anyone who could help me find parts for it. Also, sorry about the crappy pics.




 

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The stock can be repaired with epoxy. The firing pin would be easier to repair than replace. A good gunsmith should be able to retip the pin by welding a piece on to it.

Doug
 
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If it were mine I'd follow Doug's advice. Those are easy and relatively inexpensive repairs. A good stock maker can easily epoxy that piece back on with minimum signs of repair. The welding and shaping of the tip should be well within a gunsmith's capabilities. If it isn't he is a parts changer; not a gunsmith.
 

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Ride down to BFE and see Billy Tierce in Utica, MS

He'll fix you up..

Bills Gun Shop His Ph# is in the sticky in the gunsmithing section...

Couple months wait...He's a busy man
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sounds like sound advice. I know a thing or two about welding.... and I know that in dealing with a piece of heat treated steel,which almost all of that rifle is composed of according to the information I've read and found over the years, welding on/in one area will weaken another.

Now I'm not against learning a new thing or two, in fact I love being shown that I'm wrong about something that I wasn't totally knowledgeable about.

But welding a new tip onto a firing pin and expecting that pin to perform as though it was never altered? Is the pin annealed after being welded?


The epoxy on the stock sounds like a no-biggy situation. I just wasn't sure if I would end up sanding it down after gluing/epoxying it on myself... I'm still unsure if I want to alter the patina of the rifle.


It seems this is Louis' site, http://berk1.tripod.com/type38.html, how interesting... I guess domain names change, huh?

Doug, would a gun smith charge me less than $40 to repair the pin? It seems that current value is between $20 and $30 for one.
 

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I never said to weld the firing pin tip. I would drill it out replace the pin and silver solder the new tip.

Doug
 

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James D. said:
The epoxy on the stock sounds like a no-biggy situation. I just wasn't sure if I would end up sanding it down after gluing/epoxying it on myself... I'm still unsure if I want to alter the patina of the rifle.
You should be able to glue the broken piece back into place with little or no problem to the finish if you use a little wax first. Fit the broken piece in place as tightly as you can and then run a healthy coat of wax along the seam where the edges of the break come together. I'd probably try for a strip of wax 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch on either side of the edge. Then remove the broken piece, apply the adhesive of your choice to the stock and the broken piece - following directions of course. Spread the glue evenly on both pieces using a brush - I personally like to use the metal handled flux brushes with the short bristles. Put the broken piece in place and apply pressure. Clamp if possible or use tape to firmly seat and hold the piece while the glue dries. You could even use big rubber bands as long as you can get even pressure across the entire surface.

The reason for using the wax is when you apply pressure to the two pieces you're going to get some squeeze out and the glue will not adhere to the wax. When the glue has dried you'll be able to easily remove the excess and then clean up the wax with a mild solvent of some type - anything that won't damage the current finish. I use rubbing alcohol, but I'm usually working with unfinished wood, not a finished product like you'll be. If the broken piece does not fit perfectly into the stock and there is a line where it broke, you should be able to find a touch up stick at one of the big boxes and with a little care come up with an almost invisible repair.

When I'm working on a piece of furniture I use this technique on all visible glue joints. I prefer to use Butcher's Bowling Alley Wax or a Minwax Finishing Wax. In any case, use a wax that does not have silicon in it as a finish will not adhere if you do.

I also prefer to use Titebond III glue, but any good woodworking glue will do - the wood will break before your glued up repair will.

Papa
 

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Yep, e-gunparts or actually GunPartsCorp now. They still list a lot of parts for the Type 38. They list the firing pin but it's expensive.
I REALLY like the Arisakas. Supposedly has one of, if not THE, strongest action of any bolt gun.
 

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BearsBoy said:
Yep, e-gunparts or actually GunPartsCorp now. They still list a lot of parts for the Type 38. They list the firing pin but it's expensive.
I REALLY like the Arisakas. Supposedly has one of, if not THE, strongest action of any bolt gun.
P. O. Ackley actually did some tests on some of the rifle actions of the period. The Type 38 was one of the strongest with the Type 99 second. Springfields, Mausers, Enfields, Carcanos were far behind. From what I understand the the 38 took a double proof load.
 

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Yup, he actually fitted bull barrels to all those different actions. He stopped upping the loads when the actions split or blew apart. He only stopped upping the loads on the Arisaka when the barrel split.
 
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