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I serve on the safety team at my church. They put together a team building event at a range owned bu one of our church members. As many of the team as could came down to spend some time on the range and enjoyed hamburgers and hot dogs afterwards. What made the range time noteworthy is that they often host USPSA matches at this range and they still had two stages setup.

So, we got to run through the course. The USPSA rules were explained (as well as gun safety) and we were timed as we went through the course. If you've never seen this type of course what you have is multiple shooting stations with a variety of targets to shoot at. You're expected to put two rounds into each target and some are "no shoot" (hostage) or "hard surface" targets (meaning if you hit the black areas, you missed). Each target has an "A" (center mass or head shot), "C" (area adjacent to"A"), and a "D" (barely on the cardboard) zone with the greatest number of points in the"A" zone. Depending on the scoring rule used, you can shoot as many times at any given target so long as you don't run out of bullets. Some stages have steel in them. The target distances range from 3' to over 15' (maybe as much as 25').

The first stage I ran had 22 cardboard targets and 6 steel. I used exactly 28 shots and scored 21 "A" and 1 "C" zone hits. I hit all six steel targets @ 12' - 15' so, no misses. I was shooting my Shield so I had 4 mag changes. The second stage was 26 shots and I scored 24 "A" and 2 "C" zone hits. Again, no wasted shots and 4 mag changes.

Despite hitting the most targets with the fewest rounds, i finished fourth in the informal competition based on time. I didn't feel like i was creeping, and the 4 mag changes didn't help, but my times were slower that the others who seems to spray and pray. The hit ratio, or final score, is determined by taking your total points and dividing them by your total time. I was hurt by the fact that, since this was informal, the trainer was giving everyone 6 point for the metal where I was the only one who scored all 6. As an example of times, in the second stage, the winners time was 43.xx seconds while mine was 74.xx. The instructor commented, "Jerery may not have been the fastest shooter but his targets weren't getting back up."

But, this post isn't about bragging about my shooting prowess....well, maybe a little. I'm posting this because the experience was so much better than standing at the firing line and sending lead down range. Having to move, acquire the target, distinguish between bad guys and good guys, and deal with reloads while being timed changes your whole perspective on training. I wasn't prepared for what I would face in the first stage but, for the second stage, I was planning tactical reloads to avoid slide lock. Knowing your round count saves time and could save your life.

So, while I don't see myself jumping into competition any time soon, I would welcome the opportunity to train like that in the future. I strongly encourage you to seek out similar opportunities.

One last thing, I have to tell on myself. I mentioned to the instructor that it would have helped me if the perforations that delineate the various zone were oulined in black as my old eyes had trouble seeing them. Rather than the expected response of, "Hey, that's a great idea" what I got was, "You're supposed to know where to hit. Do you expect a live target is going to have little dots on his head and chest to show you were to aim." I haven't felt that stupid since basic....but he's right.
 

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"...that stuff will get you killed in the streets !!!....." SARCASM EMOJI

Joking aside; Good on ya for trying something different!
The "felt"pressure of having a timer and everyone watching you does make for additional stress in new scenarios.
 

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Think, any practice, getting away from Static In Place, is a plus. I used to shoot @ couples places, a multi-senero. was very helpful.
 

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Keep working on it. Don't discount the importance of speed combined with accuracy. It might seem like the good shooters are spraying and praying but I promise you they aren't. The eye can see very quickly and the brain can process the information fast enough to allow every shot to not only be aimed, but called. Calling your shots means you know where the shot landed based off the relation of your sights to the target as the shot broke. You'll know you hit the target just from reading your sights and you won't have to look through them or over them for the holes in the paper. This is the beginning of true speed.

Think about it, taking 3 seconds to shoot a target with two rounds accurately isn't as helpful if your opponent only needs 2 seconds to shoot you 6 times and his first shot only takes .9 seconds from the holster. Speed is just as important as accuracy.
 

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USPSA is definitely good training and will help you with both self defense and marksmanship... but I mainly like it because it's just a lot of fun. My experience with USPSA was some super talented people would put in hours drawing up stage diagrams that were just incredible, then on match days a team of 40 or more people would all pitch in to set those stages up in an hour or so. You would NEVER get the opportunity to do some of these things on your own, even if you owned your own range. We would have 4-6 incredible shooting challenges to solve and you got to do it with a mostly great bunch of people. Some were super competitive, but most were just average Joe's out having a good time with friends. It's mostly guys but women and kids shot with us all the time and were competitive. I don't know of any other individual sport that offers anything close to the variety, the camaraderie, the opportunity to train and improve, etc. Sounds like you had a great experience and I would encourage you and anyone reading this to find a local USPSA club (they're all over the place) and check it out.
 

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USPSA is definitely good training and will help you with both self defense and marksmanship... but I mainly like it because it's just a lot of fun. My experience with USPSA was some super talented people would put in hours drawing up stage diagrams that were just incredible, then on match days a team of 40 or more people would all pitch in to set those stages up in an hour or so. You would NEVER get the opportunity to do some of these things on your own, even if you owned your own range. We would have 4-6 incredible shooting challenges to solve and you got to do it with a mostly great bunch of people. Some were super competitive, but most were just average Joe's out having a good time with friends. It's mostly guys but women and kids shot with us all the time and were competitive. I don't know of any other individual sport that offers anything close to the variety, the camaraderie, the opportunity to train and improve, etc. Sounds like you had a great experience and I would encourage you and anyone reading this to find a local USPSA club (they're all over the place) and check it out.
Then you left us with @MrClean 😢😢😢😢
 

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Keep working on it. Don't discount the importance of speed combined with accuracy. It might seem like the good shooters are spraying and praying but I promise you they aren't. The eye can see very quickly and the brain can process the information fast enough to allow every shot to not only be aimed, but called. Calling your shots means you know where the shot landed based off the relation of your sights to the target as the shot broke. You'll know you hit the target just from reading your sights and you won't have to look through them or over them for the holes in the paper. This is the beginning of true speed.

Think about it, taking 3 seconds to shoot a target with two rounds accurately isn't as helpful if your opponent only needs 2 seconds to shoot you 6 times and his first shot only takes .9 seconds from the holster. Speed is just as important as accuracy.
Yep.
Jaw Beard Font Darkness Brand
 
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