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It seems I recall they had a really bad Friday...was it the thirteenth?
13 October 1307.
"Le dieux n'est pas content, nous avons de enemis de la foi dans le Royaume!"
God is displeased, we have enemies of faith within the kingdom!
Things went downhill from there, but there were still the Teutonic knights in what became Prussia (NE Germany).
 

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Y'all do realize that the whole poet/warrior tradition goes back to medieval Germany, and has links to the Templars...lecture at 0800 Monday in my classroom. Don't be late.
I do not know the exact roots of it, missed that in my public education. It sounds interesting.
 

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I do not know the exact roots of it, missed that in my public education. It sounds interesting.
Yeah, well, if it's not on the "state test" (from whatever company the current state superintendent is receiving kickbacks from) of this year then you won't hear it in history class nowadays. History class is "pass the state test". Biology I is "pass the state test". Algebra I is "pass the state test". English 2 is "pass the state test".
:oops:
And it would all be changed if parents would simply raise h*ll with local school boards and move on up to the state Mississippi Department of Education. MDE.
In case anyone here doesn't know, our state Superintendent of Education is the highest paid state superintendent of education in the United States of America.
If that alone doesn't motivate taxpayers oh well, just roll over and play dead, pay your taxes...
 

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I do not know the exact roots of it, missed that in my public education. It sounds interesting.
One of my favorites, from "Von dem Armen Heinrich" by Hartmann von Aue. In Mittelhochdeutsch. I actually got to view the Manessische Handschrift (manuscript) while in Germany.

Ein ritter sô gelêret was
daz er an den buochen lass
waz er dar an geschriben vant
der was Hartman genant,
dienstman was er zOuwe.

There was a knight who was so well-educated
that he (could) read in books
whatever he found in them.
He was named Hartmann,
He was a knight(man at arms, man in service) at Aue.
<Translation mine>
Hartmann was writing about himself in the 3rd person, establishing his bona fide as an author, kind of like the modern back cover or liner notes used to convince why you should buy a book...only back then it was "why you should continue to read this..."

Most Germans can't read / pronounce Mittelhochdeutsch nowadays. I had to take 2 semesters during my M.A. studies to learn it. VERY different spelling sometimes, and even less use of prepositions than modern German as it used declination (i.e. grammatical case) for nouns.
 
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