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Discussion Starter #1
Would like to hear what bag you use for this and why. Links to the product are appreciated, since I'm definitely in the market for one of these right now. Thanks!
 

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I use one of the Remington packs that I found at Wal Mart. The contents are more important than the bag. Just get what ever is cheap and has some good solid straps.
 

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I also have a large Alice pack with frame. You can get then relatively cheap on evilbay. The construction of the pack is a consideration since it may get thrown around and used for a few days to a few weeks. If you have a cheap bag to carry all your gear in, it may not take any hard use. Plus, if you have to carry it any distance, you will want a sturdy frame and comfortable straps.
 

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U mean bug out bags....plural

Food bag, tool bag, gun bag, ammo bag, first aid bag, shelter bag

U see where I'm going with this...more later

as far as what I use...some are back packs...most are duffels...I aint planning on doing a lot of hiking
 

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Ive got a small bag i keep in the car with me at all times(small black tacticoolish one from gunshow). Havent set up a bigger bag yet, but have 3 or 4 of the tool bags you get with ridgid tools from home depot... very heavy duty canvas zippered bags. I know ive had 100lbs in one before.
 

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Hammer said:
Neck, how you plan on carrying those 6 bags?
That's why I like the multi-bag approach. Start out in the truck and if you have to bug out from your bug out plan, you can shed things in order of importance. Since you have your things in bags like you want them, shedding excess would be quicker. Skinny down as it were.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
sidroski said:
Hammer said:
Neck, how you plan on carrying those 6 bags?
That's why I like the multi-bag approach. Start out in the truck and if you have to bug out from your bug out plan, you can shed things in order of importance. Since you have your things in bags like you want them, shedding excess would be quicker. Skinny down as it were.
Well I just ordered a large Alice bag with frame. But I'm looking at my list of stuff to put in it and I don't think it's all gonna fit! But I sure would like to have one bag with a little bit of everything, because if I have to bug out on foot on a moment's notice, then I'd like to know I'm reasonably well-equipped. So I think for now that's going to be my goal -- to get one bag well-equipped, and maybe later I'll start building up other bags to supplement it.
 

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When you get your bag the way you want it, put on a pair of boots & go walking with it for at least 5 miles, preferably 10.

Then you'll want to go home take the kitchen sink out...
 

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My Bug-Out-Bag is an Expedition class North Face hiking pack. The reason is simple. I mentioned in another post that for many years I have been an avid hiker and have made long excursions into back country areas where firearms weren't even permitted and I certainly wasn't able to pack enough food and water for that whole time. Those are things at some point you have to acquire along the way.

The particular pack I use is an internal frame pack with extremely good, breathable padding in the back and on the straps. BTW, a waist strap/belt is crucial when your pack is weighing in at 60-80 pounds and you're planning on walking 10-15 miles a day with it. If anyone is looking for a good pack, I wouldn't necessarily put you onto a specific brand but I would encourage you to consider these types of packs especially if you are thinking about it being necessary to travel by foot and I always consider that to be a possibility. To me the term Bug-Out-Bag has always been based on the premise of walking but that was mostly due to growing up with a guy who trained special forces back in the early 70's. His philosophy was to always assume that you would need to get by with what you could carry on your back. Anyway, the most important tip that I could pass along is that ordering a pack off the Internet is not your best option or at least not initially. Go to a good outfitters shop and let them fit you for a pack if you're really serious about it. Then if you want to do some price shopping, you'll have some idea about what does and does not feel good to you. It's more important than most folks would believe.

These packs can hold a lot of stuff and I have lived out of one comfortably. If a need were to arise, I already have everything I need to get by in there and the addition of being able to strap a .22LR to the side of it and throw a brick or two of ammo in there would be welcome but not required. You will not want to carry around a well rounded pack along with three or four guns and 2000 rounds of ammo. It's just not reasonable. I'll try to get into what is in my pack on the other topic that's been started for that. Anyway, once you've assembled a pack, I'd encourage you to find a nice wooded area and take a little walking trip for a day or two or whatever you can spare. And don't just walk a mile and unpack it and set up camp. Plan a trip that requires you to move around. You'll find out quickly what you can and can't live without. :2c:
 

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I use a Blackwater Gear Camelback edition. Don't know the model number but I don't think it matters anyway since BWG is no longer. It has a 100oz reservoir built in. Its about the capacity of a medium alice.


Pro Tip:

• Pack up what you think you need and hike it for about 3-5 miles. Afterwards, you'll know what you don't "need".

• Don't go commando. Camo or OD bags or clothing draws attention like stink draws flies. You want to blend in. Stick with common subdued colors like blacks, browns, and navy.
 

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Kifaru Siwash. Kifaru makes some of the best backpacks on the planet. They are designed for backpack hunters who go deep in the backcountry for game. And hike it out by foot. They also have a military line. Expensive though you get what you pay for.

www.kifaru.net
 

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im thinking the same

i would mount a 50 on top of the toyota and let my wife drive while i pulled convoy security to the river bottom
msredneck said:
 

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Believe it or not, Army equipment for hiking is not the best equipment. Remember its all made by the lowest bidder. Its commonly thought being the best because it is used my the military. This equipment is heavy and tears up quickly. The Army just has the ability to easily deX the equipment. Like Gmsouth put it, use civilian hiking equipment. It is not cheap by any means, but made by people that hike and move around comfortably for miles upon miles.
 

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I have a granite gear Nimbus 3800cc ultralight bag. I used to do multiple day hikes and had to carry everything with me so weight was a major concern. I have many days use with the bag and no problems This is the second granite gear bag I have owned and have been extremely pleased with both.
If I was buying one specifically for a bugout bag I would consider a different pack though, the outside material is the lightweight tent style material, for a BOB I would sacrifice the extra ounces and get heavier outer material.
 
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