Mississippi Gun Owners banner

What type of grease do you guys use?

1658 Views 35 Replies 24 Participants Last post by  DEADEYE 1
I know I'm opening up a can of worms here, but I'm on the hunt for a new grease to try.

I've used some of the Hoppe's stuff before (no. 9 and black series) and whatnot, but never really liked it that much. I know some people really like automotive grease and motor oil (and for $5-10 for 1-lb vs. $15-20 for 1 oz. I can see why) - but I've never really tried it and not too sure what to look for. I've got a lot of CLP and don't really plan on switching from that to another oil, but I was considering picking up a tub of Valvoline Full Synthetic and giving it a try.

I like how much easier it is to find lab testing results, ingredients, and dropping points for automotive grease than it is for gun lubricants. It's hard to find out what kind of chemicals or additives they're putting into something like Clenzoil or MPro7 (or any other gun lube, really).

What do you guys think, is this a bad idea?
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
It really depends on the conditions - temperture primarily. But also, some greases will attract contaminants, or harden up over time, etc. . I've had good results with Slip2000. It's expensive but seems to live up to the advertising.


Some lubes, especially greases, will actually make mating parts sticker, unless they are in constant motion - which you don't have with a gun. This can negatively effect the slide/bolt to the degree that it interferes with cycling.

Others can be adsorbed into the structure of the metal, which can minutely change close tolerances and not for the better.

All in all, I tend to use as little lube (oil or grease) as possible, unless long term storage is needed.
Cal's reel drag grease is great stuff - but not cheap. However, the quantity needed for using on a slide would be so little that the high cost shouldn't be an issue. It is teflon based and it is primarily used to grease drag washers on fishing reels.
I just use 3 in 1 Tool in A Can primarily. I knew somebody who used some various greases over the years for storing some mil-surps and they settled on Slip 2000. As @GunnyGene said, it works as advertised and that's likely why they use it. I know a few others who used it for the same purpose and they never complained about the results.
High temp axle grease for all contacting parts. Runs great, after a few thousand rounds, break them down, put them in the dishwasher, Rem-Oil, then grease.
Lubriplate
Lubriplate is best with the RIFLE, CAL .30, M1 aka "Garand". Do not rely on oil of any type if you are shooting an M1, or M1A for that matter, in competition. For storage and protection oil will be OK but to remain reliable an M1-type rifle runs on grease, not oil.
Lubriplate or similar is also ok for the 1911A1 type platform, but CLP or RemOil would be good as well.
For any AR platform a CLP or similar is good, even RemOil. The AR platform runs better when wet. Problem is, as pointed out earlier, that also attracts contaminates that can lead to malfunctions.
If you are going to spend time in very low temperatures, a low-temp lubricant is necessary. I honestly have little experience there, but I did have a lot of the Bundeswehr oil for a while, I do not know what it was other than it was government-issued and approved for the cold German winters.
See less See more
  • Like
Reactions: 2
Lubriplate for garand and “travel” ARs

Rest get coat of sumgy lube or Wilson combat grease if need something thicker/tackier
I like a thin grease with some tack.

I mix synthetic 2-stroke oil and a little bar oil into urea grease until I get the consistency and tack I want.
Most grease I use is Shell Gadus S2 V100 3 or S5 V100 2.
If I'm frying white perch, I find that plain old Crisco works best.
  • Like
  • Haha
Reactions: 5
My whole kit is pretty much hoppes #9, CLP, and whatever bearing grease is loaded in my grease gun, never had any issues. Black powder pistol gets greased with Crisco.

I feel like most people overthink this.

Like fluid film and silicone rags too for rust protection.
  • Like
Reactions: 1
I use the lucas red and tacky but very sparingly and only in certain areas like where the bcg slides across hammer on an AR or AK maybe a small dab in the rails on AKs or the upper receiver channel on an AR. Other than that a quality CLP, I usually run the glocks almost dry to minimize dust/lint attracted into them. I do like to use white lithium grease on trigger contact surfaces, slicker than oil. As stated previously some greases gum in cold Temps, something to be aware of.
I use the lucas red and tacky but very sparingly and only in certain areas like where the bcg slides across hammer on an AR or AK maybe a small dab in the rails on AKs or the upper receiver channel on an AR. Other than that a quality CLP, I usually run the glocks almost dry to minimize dust/lint attracted into them. I do like to use white lithium grease on trigger contact surfaces, slicker than oil. As stated previously some greases gum in cold Temps, something to be aware of.
What cold temps do you speak of?? Lol
  • Like
Reactions: 1
What cold temps do you speak of?? Lol
Lol maybe this man has an Alaskan expedition planned. Hadn't experienced any grease gumming cold down here.
  • Like
  • Haha
Reactions: 2
I've used it all. Motor oil. Cooking oil (mostly for knives). But my standard fare is Lucas CLP:

Product Font Drink Liquid Electric blue
See less See more
  • Like
Reactions: 1
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top