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For a general purpose, do all cartridge I still believe that .308 is king, the 6.5 is a paper optimized cartridge and with the small deer that we have here in south Ms proper selection of projectiles is paramount.
Projectiles like the Hornady ELD-X used in their precision hunter cartridges seem to perform ideally vs the fusion/core lokt bonded soft points, especially at closer range where the velocity is higher.

Personally I don’t own a 6.5 because the cartridge isn’t optimized for my uses, and 90% of the people that I see come through the shop don’t benefit from the 6.5 over a .308 or 7mm-08, but because of marketing saying it’s “the best thing since sliced bread” people are buying it up.

Personally there on 2 cartridges that are “new” that I have an interest in for my uses are the 6.8 SPC (short barrel suppressed AR-15 performance for deer and hogs) and 6.8 western (short action, Long range, high energy on target).
If you look at the ballistic coefficient for the 6.5mm projectiles available, they are ballistically superior to the .30 caliber projectiles. (disclaimer: I taught physics for a while) The only thing the .30 caliber projectiles have as an advantage, military-wise, is the wide availability of projectiles for special purposes, such as tracer, AP, APIT, etc. There is a reason that 6.5mm rifle shooters have won the National Championships in several categories for quite a while now, but I do agree that most people won't see the difference between it and the .30 caliber cartridges. A "long shot" for a deer hunter here in Mississippi is generally what I'd consider close range, ie, less than 300m.
I have taken a LOT of game from crows to coyotes to large (relatively speaking, this is Mississippi) deer. Some with Swede milsurp when I wasn't hunting but came upon a deer or coyote as a target of opportunity, but the Swede milsurp FMJ has such a thin jacket they disintegrate on impact with flesh. If you have seen such a projectile strike a coyote, you know what I mean, the jacket basically sheds on impact. I never understood the need for the 6.5 Creedmore when the 6.5 x 55 is considered the "go-to" caliber in Europe for most game, including moose.
 

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If the military is infact moving away from the 6.5 CM, it will have a big impact of the on going future of the cartridge.

Now the Ammo, and gun mfs, etc. are loving it. It allows them to sell more of their products, than just
the usual stuff, most of us use. It's good for their business. They have marketed the heck out of it.

If long range shooters like it, it will have it's following.

(I have yet to indulge, doubt I will.)
 

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If the military is infact moving away from the 6.5 CM, it will have a big impact of the on going future of the cartridge.

Now the Ammo, and gun mfs, etc. are loving it. It allows them to sell more of their products, than just
the usual stuff, most of us use. It's good for their business. They have marketed the heck out of it.

If long range shooters like it, it will have it's following.

(I have yet to indulge, doubt I will.)
Yup, IMHO, the 6.5 Creedmore is just another "caliber du jour", like all of the WSM calibers, the big hot thing when they come out, only to discover they were just another marketing ploy. Yet another caliber that can do what an already OLD, established caliber can do, but in a new, improved, snazzy new package so you will have to buy another rifle in that new caliber...
 

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Yup, IMHO, the 6.5 Creedmore is just another "caliber du jour", like all of the WSM calibers, the big hot thing when they come out, only to discover they were just another marketing ploy. Yet another caliber that can do what an already OLD, established caliber can do, but in a new, improved, snazzy new package so you will have to buy another rifle in that new caliber...
Yep, this is especially true, since the 260 Remington has been available for awhile.
 

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I guess my thoughts are if I can handle Whelen and Win mag w/o flinching issues, why would I ever shoot something less effective in case of a marginal hit? I have killed deer with .222 on up but I realize that as i get older I don't care for long tracking jobs, and these rounds afford some extra leeway if the shot isn't perfect.
Even a 35 Whelen or 300 Win Mag with the wrong bullets won't make up for bad shot placement.
 

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I never understood the need for the 6.5 Creedmore when the 6.5 x 55 is considered the "go-to" caliber in Europe for most game, including moose.
Not a need - but the ability to chamber the 6.5CM in a true short action with long, heavy bullets that would require an intermediate-length or long action for the 6.5x55.

With a long action and proper chamber the Swede can be made to safely outperform the 6.5CM.
 

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I believe that they are going to start using the 6.8 PRC cartridge. They evaluated the 6.5 but went with the 6.8. There are several gun makers that are building a squad automatic weapon in this caliber prototypes under contract.
As of the 11th of October of this year it was still "go".

The Army’s M4, M16 and SAW replacement is on its way (armytimes.com)

The Army’s M4, M16 and SAW replacement is on its way
By Todd South
Monday, Oct 11


One of these three prototypes could be the Army's replacement for the M4/M16 among close combat forces. (Jacqueline Belker)

WASHINGTON — Replacements for the M4 carbine, the M16 and the M249 Squad Automatic Weapon are on track to be in production in about a year.
The Next Generation Squad Weapon rifle and automatic rifle are expected to be selected by mid-2022, Maj. Gen. Anthony Potts told Army Times before the Association of the U.S. Army’s annual meeting.

t took a few years for the Army to decide on a caliber, but they ultimately chose the “intermediate” 6.8mm to replace the existing 5.56mm used in the M4, M16 and M249.
The 6.8mm is similar in size to the classic .270 caliber used in hunting and nearly the same dimensions as a popular intermediate caliber favored by the early 20th century Japanese military.
That caliber shows better performance, accuracy, lethality and control than the 5.56mm.
Sig Sauer selected by U.S. Army for Next Generation Weapons

Sig Sauer selected by U.S. Army for Next Generation Weapons

The 5.56mm has a lethal range of about 300 meters, versus 600 meters for the new 6.8mm.
“This is a weapon that could defeat any body armor, any planned body armor that we know of in the future,” then-Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley said in 2019. “This is a weapon that can go out at ranges that are unknown today. There is a target acquisition system built into this thing that is unlike anything that exists today. This is a very sophisticated weapon.”
The three companies vying for the contract to supply a new weapon to the Army’s close combat forces, infantry, special operations forces, Marines and engineers are Sig Sauer, Textron Systems and an offering formerly from General Dynamics OTS now being handled by Lonestar Future Weapons.
Sig Sauer has built a weapon similar in style and feel to existing assault rifle configurations. Sig Sauer previously won the contract to replace the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps M9 pistol with the Modular Handgun System, or M17.
 

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If you look at the ballistic coefficient for the 6.5mm projectiles available, they are ballistically superior to the .30 caliber projectiles. (disclaimer: I taught physics for a while) The only thing the .30 caliber projectiles have as an advantage, military-wise, is the wide availability of projectiles for special purposes, such as tracer, AP, APIT, etc. There is a reason that 6.5mm rifle shooters have won the National Championships in several categories for quite a while now, but I do agree that most people won't see the difference between it and the .30 caliber cartridges. A "long shot" for a deer hunter here in Mississippi is generally what I'd consider close range, ie, less than 300m.
I have taken a LOT of game from crows to coyotes to large (relatively speaking, this is Mississippi) deer. Some with Swede milsurp when I wasn't hunting but came upon a deer or coyote as a target of opportunity, but the Swede milsurp FMJ has such a thin jacket they disintegrate on impact with flesh. If you have seen such a projectile strike a coyote, you know what I mean, the jacket basically sheds on impact. I never understood the need for the 6.5 Creedmore when the 6.5 x 55 is considered the "go-to" caliber in Europe for most game, including moose.
6.5 absolutely has ballistic superiority in regards to aerodynamics. .30 cal has the edge when it comes to punching larger holes in shoulders without relying on a projectile to expand as advertised/designed.
 
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For long range target or competition shooting I started with .204 and over the years progressed to 22.250, now that I am older, wiser and have more disposable income I switched to .338 a few years back.
 

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TL;DR, shot placement and bullet selection are key. 6.5cm has been around for quite a while and is showing now signs of slowing down that I’ve noticed. I initially bought a gun in 6.5cm as a bench gun, then decided to give deer hunting a shot this year, so it only made sense to buy a gun in a caliber I already stock. I can confirm that a 6.5cm in Hornady’s 143gr ELD-X will demolish a shoulder and stop a decent size deer in its tracks.

Yell at the clouds all y’all want, but times change.

ETA: 6.5cm existing doesn’t make your .308 less valuable or great, it’s just different and has its own pros and cons. It’s ok.
 

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Marketing. Plain and simple.
You throw the words Tacticool, Precision, Long Range, Sniper, and Ballistic Coefficient around enough folks buy into it.

I've got a 6.5 barrel somewhere. Just haven't had the want to throw it on a rifle and blast.

223 and 6.8 get everything done that I want done. And I've killed deer out to 750 yards with 223 and 550 yards with 6.8. Thousands of hogs dead with them too. Even burnt several barrels out practicing close to long range.

Gimme a 77gr 223 over a 6.5 Needmore or any other new wizbang name. I'd be happy.
 

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I remember when all anybody had was a 30-30 or an old shotgun. Those guys never grumbled about inadequate tools. It seems to me that most modern shooters are able to accomplish far less with far superior options.

The 6.5 CM is a fine cartridge, just like all the rest of them.
 
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